Clinton Foundation awards scholarship to winner of 'Ideas Matter' essay contest

President Bill Clinton with the winners of the 2013 "Ideas Matter" Essay Contest, from left: Emily Brady, runner-up; Abilgail Hill, first place; and E. Taylor Stone, runner-up.


Abigail Hill of Conway High School Wins Annual Essay Contest 'Ideas Matter'

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (Jan. 10, 2014) – The William J. Clinton Foundation is pleased to announce the winner and runners-up of the "Ideas Matter" annual essay contest. Abigail Hill, a senior at Conway High School, won the top prize and a $2,500 scholarship. Runners-up are Emily Bradley, also a senior at Conway High School, and E. Taylor Stone, a senior at the Arkansas School for Mathematics, Sciences and the Arts. 
 
"The Ideas Matter essay contest challenges Arkansas students to develop innovative solutions to pressing global challenges," said Stephanie S. Streett, executive director of the Clinton Foundation. "Every year, I am reminded that our students are as globally conscious as they are compassionate, and we are thrilled that so many students take the opportunity to participate in the contest." 
 
The essay contest is open to 11th and 12th grade Arkansas students who submit a 500-word (minimum) essay addressing the following writing prompt: "In today's interdependent world, there are many challenges facing our world. The Clinton Foundation's mission is to improve global health, strengthen economies, promote healthier childhoods, and protect the environment." Choose and define one of these topics and propose your own ideas and solutions to help solve the problem.
 
Hill's winning essay addressed the issue of childhood poverty and food insecurity. Her solution included the expansion of a program she started a few years ago. "Backpacks for Home" is a nonprofit that works with the Conway Public Schools to provide weekend meals for students and their families. Her essay also issued a call to action to every community in a strategic effort to reduce, and eliminate, childhood hunger. 
 
Hill said, "With a program such as Backpacks for Home, willing volunteers, and in-kind donations, child hunger could be minimized within communities across the nation." 
 
Bradley's runner-up essay emphasized the health and wellness opportunities provided by school gardens. Citing multiple studies and statistics, Bradley made a compelling case for the benefits of school gardens, and Stone's essay proposed the creation of a global coalition to address access to quality education.  
 
This is the fourth year the Clinton Foundation has sponsored the "Ideas Matter" Essay Contest. The essays were read and judged by a panel comprised of faculty from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, and were graded on the basis of elements including composition, style, usage, mechanics, sentence formation, and content.
 
About the Clinton Foundation
The Bill, Hillary & Chelsea Clinton Foundation convenes businesses, governments, NGOs, and individuals to improve global health and wellness, increase opportunity for women and girls, reduce childhood obesity, create economic opportunity and growth, and help communities address the effects of climate change. Because of our work, 20,000 American schools are providing kids with healthy food choices in an effort to eradicate childhood obesity; 21,000 farmers in Malawi have improved their incomes by more than 500 percent; 248 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions are being reduced in cities worldwide; more than 5,000 people have been trained in marketable job skills in Colombia; more than 6.8 million people have benefited from lifesaving HIV/AIDS medications; $100 million in strategic investments have been made, impacting the health of 25 million people in the U.S.; and members of the Clinton Global Initiative have made nearly 2,500 Commitments to Action to improve more than 430 million lives around the world.
 
 
About the William J. Clinton Presidential Center
The William J. Clinton Presidential Center & Park is a world-class educational and cultural venue offering a variety of special events, exhibitions, educational programs and lectures throughout the year. Located on the banks of the Arkansas River in Little Rock, the Clinton Center has welcomed more than three million visitors from around the world to its grounds since opening in 2004. Most importantly, the Clinton Center is a reflection of the work – past, present, and future – of the 42nd President of the United States.
 

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