Partnership to Save Africa's Elephants

Commitment by Wildlife Conservation Society, African Wildlife Foundation, World Wildlife Fund, International Fund for Animal Welfare, The Nature Conservancy and Conservation International

Partners: African Parks Network, Association of Zoos and Aquariums, Frankfurt Zoological Society, Freeland Foundation, International Conservation Caucus Foundation, National Geographic, Save the Elephants, TRAFFIC, WildAid, WildLifeDirect, Howard Buffett Foundation
In 2013, Wildlife Conservation Society, African Wildlife Foundation, World Wildlife Fund, International Fund for Animal Welfare, Conservation International and their partners committed to preventing further elephant poaching by directly targeting the chief drivers of poaching. This commitment takes a triple pronged approach by dedicating funding to: “stop the killing,” “stop the trafficking,” and “stop the demand.” This coalition of organizations will work with African leaders to support their governments' efforts to curb elephant poaching and ivory trafficking. They will also work to 'stop the demand' internationally by building on current awareness campaigns and promoting engagement with consumer country governments. This collaborative commitment has massive impact potential for improving the future survival of the world’s last great elephant populations.

Lend Your Voice to Prevent Poaching

Together we can stop the killing, stop the trafficking, and stop the demand.

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Commitment Summary

Launched

2013

Region

Asia, Africa, Middle East, Europe

Commitment by: 

Wildlife Conservation Society, African Wildlife Foundation, World Wildlife Fund, International Fund for Animal Welfare, The Nature Conservancy, Conservation International

Est. Duration

3 years

Countries

Belgium, Benin, Botswana, Brunei, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Democratic Republic of Congo, Cote d’lvoire, Egypt, Ethiopia, France, Gabon, Germany, Ghana, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Malaysia, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, Nigeria, Philippines, Portugal, Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, South Sudan, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Uganda, UK, US, Vietnam, Zambia, Zimbabwe 

Partners

African Parks Network, Association of Zoos and Aquariums, Frankfurt Zoological Society, Freeland Foundation, International Conservation Caucus Foundation, National Geographic, Save the Elephants, TRAFFIC, WildAid, WildLifeDirect, Howard Buffett Foundation

 

UPDATES ABOUT THIS COMMITMENT:

African elephants are being slaughtered at an unprecedented rate as demand for ivory continues unabated. In 2012, some 35,000 African elephants were killed, representing the worst mass slaughter of elephants since the international ivory trade was banned in 1989. African forest elephants in particular have been devastated by poaching and have declined by about 76 percent since 2002. At this rate, African forest elephants could effectively be extinct over the next decade.

As one of the world’s most lucrative criminal activities, valued at $7-10 billion annually, the illegal wildlife trade ranks fifth globally in terms of value, behind the trafficking in drugs, people, oil, and counterfeiting. Increasing consumer demand for ivory, particularly in Asia, is causing the price of ivory to skyrocket, thereby driving the illegal trade in elephant ivory and the mass slaughter of elephants in Africa. Today’s ivory traffickers are primarily well-organized syndicates that operate as transnational criminal networks and often participate in other illegal activities, including trafficking in narcotics and weapons, and some have links with terrorist networks.

Urgent and immediate action is required to address the poaching crisis on three fronts: 1) Stop the killing; 2) Stop the trafficking; and 3) Stop the demand. The Wildlife Conservation Society, World Wildlife Fund, African Wildlife Foundation, International Fund for Animal Welfare and Conservation International have partnered with 11 other non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to lead this three-pronged approach and halt the decline of African elephants by the end of 2016.

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