Drug pricing agreements have saved the developing world more than $1 billion.
Working with the governments of developing countries and the pharmaceutical industry, Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI) has helped dramatically lower the cost of lifesaving medicines and diagnostics for HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis. Globally, CHAI negotiates price reductions for drugs and diagnostics, customize products for resource-limited settings, and work to broaden the supply base and increase the quality of these treatments.

Working with the governments of developing countries and the pharmaceutical industry, Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI) has helped dramatically lower the cost of lifesaving medicines and diagnostics for HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis. Globally, CHAI negotiates price reductions for drugs and diagnostics, customize products for resource-limited settings, and work to broaden the supply base and increase the quality of these treatments.

To create impact, CHAI often uses a “market-shaping” approach, which has been significant in producing new and improved products from more suppliers at lower prices. CHAI has reduced prices up to 90 percent for key drugs for HIV, malaria, and TB, and up to 80 percent for HIV diagnostics, saving more than $1 billion in total. Currently, patients in more than 70 countries pay the reduced prices achieved through our negotiations. Almost five million people with HIV—60 percent of all people being treated—and more than 30 million people with malaria have benefited from these reduced-pricing agreements.