By addressing health and wellness issues, employers have the opportunity to create environments where wellness programs are encouraged, easily accessible, and promoted, while earning $3.27 for every wellness dollar invested.
Employers across the United States are increasingly spending more on healthcare and lost productivity than they are on raw materials or other labor and development costs. The un-well workforce costs employers $153 billion annually, a figure set to rise to $1.201 trillion by 2023 and $5.668 trillion by 2050. Employees who are thriving or considered well cost employers 41% less than employees who are struggling, and 62% less cost than employees who are suffering. If left unaddressed, the chronic and preventable disease that affects 1 in 2 adults will continue to decrease productivity, and increase workforce stress, attending work while sick, absenteeism, and healthcare costs.

THE PROBLEM

Employers across the United States are increasingly spending more on healthcare and lost productivity than they are on raw materials or other labor and development costs. The un-well workforce costs employers $153 billion annually,[1] a figure set to rise to $1.201 trillion by 2023 and $5.668 trillion by 2050.[2]. Employees who are thriving or considered well cost employers 41% less than employees who are struggling, and 62% less cost than employees who are suffering.[3] If left unaddressed, the chronic and preventable disease that affects 1 in 2 adults[4] will continue to decrease productivity, and increase workforce stress, attending work while sick, absenteeism, and healthcare costs.

THE SOLUTION

The Clinton Foundation’s Health Matters Initiative (CHMI) builds strategic partnerships across sectors that will help facilitate the development and scaling of health promoting solutions, as well as leverage technology and digital innovation to help advance health and wellness at the national and community levels by disseminating evidence-based individual, systems, and investment strategies. 

CHMI will work with employers to improve employee health outcomes, decrease health disparities and reduce healthcare costs through the development of an evidence-based and comprehensive employee health and well-being approach.

By utilizing the CHMI Employee Effectiveness and Well-Being Approach and Framework to guide the appropriate evidence based implementation companies can implement a continuous quality improvement process to build upon their efforts to create healthier environments through an integrated approach across:

• Benefits and value added benefits design
• Employee wellness programs
• Corporate social responsibility strategies
• Core business practices

THE IMPACT

By addressing health and wellness issues, employers have the opportunity to create environments where wellness programs are
encouraged, easily accessible, and promoted, while earning $3.27 for every wellness dollar invested.[5]

CHMI’s Employee Effectiveness and Well-Being Approach’s standards are based on the best available evidence from effective programs, policies, practices and laws. Collectively, these show that the greatest way to affect employee effectiveness and well-being is through on-going, comprehensive programs that 1) take employees’ needs and lifestyles into account and 2) are aimed at changing behaviors. [6] Such evidence has proven that worksite wellness programs are particularly effective in increasing productivity and reducing healthcare cost, attending work while sick, and absenteeism by: 

• Reducing stress 
• Increasing physical activity and nutrition  
• Increasing smoking cessation 
• Decreasing workplace injury[7]


[1] Rath, T, & Harter, J (2012). Unhealthy, stressed employees are hurting your business. Gallup Business Journal, May 22, 2012, retrieved from: http://businessjournal.gallup.com/content/154643/unhealthy-stressed-employees-hurting-business.aspx

[2] DeVol, R., Bedroussian, A (2007). An unhealthy America: The economic burden of chronic diseases. Santa Monica, CA: The Milken Institute

[3] Bath, T & Harter, J. (2012)

[4] National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (2009). At a glance 2009. Atlanta, GA: Center for Disease Control.

[5] Baicker, K., Cutler, D., & Song. (2010). Workplace wellness programs can generate savings. Health Affairs, 29(2), 304-311.

[6] Shinogle, J., & Martinez, L. (2012). Healthiest Maryland business evaluation final report. Baltimore, MD: Maryland Institute for Policy Analysis & Research.

[7] IBID.