Webcasts

 
Special Remarks

Designing Diplomacy for the 21st Century

Metropolitan Ballroom

Remarks:

Hillary Rodham Clinton, Secretary of State, U.S. Department of State

 
Plenary Session

Women and the Built Environment: Designing for Opportunity

Metropolitan Ballroom

Women play a key role in designing more productive, inclusive built environments. Studies show that involving women greatly improves outcomes across a wide variety of issues, ranging from public health to environmental conservation. Yet current urban planning efforts often overlook the value that women can bring to their communities.

• How can women be empowered with the decision-making and management responsibilities needed to design environments that work better for everyone?
• How can more inclusive design approaches unlock access to key services, expand economic opportunities, and reduce inequality?

Moderator:

Nicholas D. Kristof, Columnist, The New York Times

Participants:

Joan Clos, Under-Secretary General and Executive Director, UN-HABITAT
Salma Samar Damluji, Chief Architect, Daw‘an Mud Brick Architecture Foundation
Elizabeth Heider, Senior Vice President, Skanska USA Building Inc.
Jonathan Reckford, Chief Executive Officer, Habitat for Humanity International

 
Special Session

Champions of Action

New York East

In a globalizing world, individuals have an unprecedented power to both affect and benefit from change. Truly transformative movements give primacy to human, economic, and environmental rights and prioritize the human experience in the process of community design. These movements also offer opportunities to create inclusive, responsible environments that advance the individual as well as the collective. In this special session, speakers will reflect on transformation in times of rapid change, and will discuss how they have applied the lessons of their personal journeys to supporting others who are seeking to enhance the environments we share.

Moderator:

Madeleine K. Albright, Chair, Albright Stonebridge Group

Participants:

Paul Farmer, Founder, Partners in Health
Tawakkol Karman, Co-founder, Women Journalists Without Chains; 2011 Nobel Peace Prize Winner
Jimmy Wales, Founder, Wikipedia.org

 

Strategic Philanthropy: How To Think Bigger and Do Better

New York West

Philanthropic actors have historically focused on addressing problems and giving grants in line with the organization’s size. With limited resources, philanthropists usually restrict their programs by addressing large problems in defined geographic areas or focusing on small problems that can be solved globally. Only the biggest philanthropic actors—often in consortium—have strived to tackle the largest problems on a global scale. No matter their resources, philanthropists’ aim should always seek to maximize their impact. This session will explore creative ways for established and new philanthropists to think bigger and do better, be it through providing seed grants to social enterprises or building partnerships with corporations.

Moderator:

Kevin Starr, Managing Director, Mulago Foundation

Participants:

Francisco Suárez Hernández, Sustainability Director, FEMSA
Trevor Mundel, President, Global Health Program, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Jacqueline Novogratz, Founder and CEO, Acumen Fund, Inc
Sally Osberg, President and CEO, Skoll Foundation

 
Plenary Session

The Early Years: An Irresistible Investment Opportunity

Metropolitan Ballroom

Starting children on the right path has one of the highest returns of any social investment, with early childhood development programs returning as much as $18 for every dollar invested. High quality early childhood education programs develop the foundation for critical workforce skills that boost economic growth and reduce long-term social costs. Furthermore, ensuring essential nutrition during the first 1,000 days of life can increase a country’s GDP by two to three percent.

• How can health, care and education programs be designed as integrated, holistic systems for early childhood development?
• What are the most effective interventions, and how can they be scaled up?
• How can corporations and governments design programs that empower parents, teachers, and community health workers to provide the care and life skills children need to thrive?

Moderator:

Geeta Rao Gupta, Deputy Executive Director, UNICEF

Participants:

Joyce Banda, President of the Republic of Malawi
Bill Goodwyn, Chief Executive Officer, Discovery Education, Discovery Communications Inc.
Carolyn S. Miles, President and CEO, Save the Children
Jay Naidoo, Chairman, Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN)

 
Breakout Sessions

Financing for Impact and Scale

New York West

In a world of tight capital and lending constraints, creative approaches to financing are more important than ever in transforming ideas into life-changing initiatives. New deal structures are giving life to innovative business models and scaling up successful pilot projects. This session will explore how the CGI community is harnessing the power of capital markets to maximize its impact.

Participants:

David Ferreira, Managing Director for Innovative Finance and Head of Washington DC Office, GAVI Alliance
Elizabeth L. Littlefield, President and CEO, Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC)
Stephan Ouaknine, Chairman, Managing Partner, and CEO, Inerjys Ventures Inc.

 

How can we design healthier urban environments that help prevent chronic diseases?

New York East

Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are chronic diseases that include cardiovascular diseases, cancers, chronic respiratory diseases, and diabetes and account for 60 percent of worldwide deaths. Eighty percent of these deaths are in low- and middle-income countries, with an estimated economic cost of $500 billion a year for Africa alone. When compared with the use of medication and surgery, preventing common risk factors, such as unhealthy diets or alcohol, is more cost effective in limiting disease burden. NCDs are far more prevalent in urban settings and the situation will only worsen with rapid urbanization in emerging economies. Therefore, it is essential to reduce the risk factors of NCDs by designing healthier urban environments—be it through better design of buildings and outdoor spaces or through public incentive and community-based programs.

Moderators:

John Cary, Founder and Editor, PublicInterestDesign.org
Liz Ogbu, Scholar in Residence, Center for Art and Public Life, California College of the Arts

Participants:

Robert Ivy, Executive Vice President and CEO, American Institute of Architects
Johanna Ralston, Chief Executive Officer, World Heart Federation

 

Haiti: Lessons for the Future

New York West

Since 2009, under the leadership of Denis O’Brien and CGI’s Haiti Action Network, CGI members have devoted considerable resources to Haiti, most significantly following the 2010 earthquake. The challenges members face and the lessons learned from their work can help improve ongoing projects in Haiti, as well as inform future efforts when responding to natural disasters around the globe. This session will provide a unique opportunity for the Haiti Action Network and the broader CGI community to explore commitments in various stages of success. Participants will engage in a candid discussion about the challenges of working in a complex setting such as Haiti.

Remarks:

Laurent Lamothe, Prime Minister of the Republic of Haiti
Cheryl D. Mills, Counselor and Chief of Staff, U.S. Department of State

Moderator:

Stephanie Strom, Correspondent, The New York Times

Participants:

David Crane, President and CEO, NRG Energy, Inc.
Duquesne Fednard, Chief Executive Officer, D & E Green Enterprises, Inc.
Anne H. Hastings, Chief Executive Officer, Fonkoze Financial Services
Sasha Kramer, Co-founder and Executive Director, Sustainable Organic Integrated Livelihoods (SOIL)
Denis O'Brien, Chairman and Founder, Digicel Group

 

How can we ensure more children benefit from early childhood education?

New York East

Continuing the discussion from the Plenary Session, "The Early Years: An Irresistible Investment Opportunity,” early childhood education has many benefits, yet it has often been neglected relative to primary school education. Children attending pre-school are not only more likely to complete primary and secondary schools, they will also earn more throughout their life and drive up their country’s GDP. Pre-schooling also serves to reduce inequalities and is associated with better childhood health and nutrition and a mother’s ability to earn a living. For a business, organized day care centers help ensure improved employee productivity, attendance, and satisfaction. Only 46 percent of pre-primary age children across the world are enrolled in education, a figure that drops to 13 percent for the least developed countries and varies vastly by income level.

Moderators:

Kate Canales, Director of Design and Innovation Programs, Southern Methodist University
Sandy Speicher, Educational Lead, IDEO

Participants:

Randa Grob-Zakhary, Chief Executive Officer, LEGO Foundation
Jacqueline Jones, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Early Learning, U.S. Department of Education