AGENDA

 

7:30 AM -

 10:30 PM


Campus Shuttle Service

Between 7:30am and 10:30pm, shuttle service will be available between the five CGI U hotels and the University of Miami campus. Shuttles will depart from the hotels and campus every 30 minutes. These shuttles will be available after the Saturday program ends to take attendees back to all five of the hotels.


 

8:00 AM -

 8:00 PM


On-Site Registration

All CGI U members are required to check-in on-site before attending any of the CGI U events and must pick up their credential and registration materials from the Hurricane 100 Room in the BankUnited Center. Please allow for time to register before the start of the events you are attending Saturday.

If you registered on-site on Friday, you do NOT need to register again on Saturday.


 

8:15 AM -

 8:45 AM


Breakfast

 
Breakfast

8:15 AM -

 8:45 AM


A continental breakfast will be provided for all attendees in the BankUnited Center Breezeway and Field House.


 
Plenary Session

9:00 AM -

 10:00 AM


The American Home Front: Creating Change in Our Own Communities

The United States is no stranger to inadequate education, limited access to health care, or skyrocketing carbon emissions. Although the economic landscape is vastly different in the U.S. than it is in many developing nations, there are currently 46 million Americans who are uninsured, and 37.3 million who are living in poverty. How can America’s universities channel their capacity for innovation and public service as a force for positive change on the domestic front? This panel will provide effective, creative ways that students and universities can make a tangible difference in their local communities - without taking a 14-hour plane trip or starting a satellite campus overseas.


 
Education Working Session

10:30 AM -

 12:00 PM


A New Age in Education: Using Traditional Media and Digital Technology

Digital media and technological breakthroughs are transforming education around the world by providing access in even the most remote regions of the world. In an effort to close the digital divide, people around the globe, including the world's leading universities, are making a vast pool of educational resources open and free to everyone. Digital advances have made it possible to transport previously unavailable libraries of information to students who are ready to learn and teachers who are eager to update their toolkits. Meanwhile, radio, television, and mobile communications are bridging enduring cultural and geographical divides, making education a reality in previously remote regions of the world. This panel will discuss the ways in which students, teachers, telecommunications experts, and social entrepreneurs are using media and technology to bring educational resources to hard-to-reach areas at home and abroad.


 
Environment & Climate Change Working Session

10:30 AM -

 12:00 PM


Sustainable Transportation: One Step to Building Sustainable Communities

Greenhouse gases from the transportation sector account for roughly 15 percent of global CO2 emissions and 30 percent of domestic CO2 emissions. As urban sprawl and personal automobile ownership rates continue to increase throughout the world, it is increasingly important for communities to improve outdated and environmentally-harmful transportation systems. Underutilized modes of sustainable transport, from bus rapid transit systems to bike-sharing programs, can reduce air pollution, save money, shorten commute times, and encourage healthy living. When implemented in conjunction with broader community sustainability efforts, these measures can have an even greater impact, including job creation and neighborhood revitalization. This session will examine how students and higher education institutions can support green transportation innovation and partner with other schools, NGOs, businesses, and local government agencies to bring the clean energy economy to scale in their own campuses and communities.


 
Peace & Human Rights Working Session

10:30 AM -

 12:00 PM


Human Trafficking: The Impact on Local Communities

According to the U.S. Department of State, there are at least 12.3 million adults and children currently in forced labor, bonded labor, and commercial sexual servitude. Additionally, approximately 600,000 to 800,000 people are trafficked across international borders each year, and up to 50 percent of them are minors. Trafficking is the third most profitable criminal activity in the world, accounting for more than $9.5 billion in annual revenue. But this is not an issue that exists exclusively in developing countries. Each year, an estimated 14,500 to 17,500 victims are trafficked into the U.S. The number of U.S. citizens trafficked within the country each year is even higher, with nearly 200,000 American children at risk for trafficking into forced labor and the sex industry. Whether it is the clothes we wear, the phones we talk on, or the food we eat, items tainted by slave labor are a part of everyday life for many Americans. Making more informed decisions as consumers could make a difference for millions of people. This panel will inform students on the issue of trafficking, how it impacts crime in the U.S., and what they can do on their own campuses to prevent it in the future.


 
Poverty Alleviation Working Session

10:30 AM -

 12:00 PM


Poverty at Home: Turning Challenge into Opportunity

Four in 10 Americans will experience poverty in their lifetimes. Today, one in seven Americans fall below the poverty line, a number that will likely increase given the current recession. Unemployment is over 15 percent in many Rust Belt cities, and over 25 percent in Imperial County, California, one of the regions hardest hit by the collapse of the housing market. The recent spike in home foreclosures has increased homelessness on a national scale, while the increasing costs of health care are leaving millions more uninsured. From the Mexico/U.S. border to the Mississippi Delta, from the hills of Appalachia to countless Native American communities, poverty in America is persistent and growing. With shrinking endowments, budget cuts, and hiring freezes, America’s colleges and universities have certainly not been spared from the ongoing recession. This panel will explore how students, universities and Americans young and old are addressing the challenges of both entrenched and recent poverty in the U.S., and how those hardest hit are finding creative solutions to the economic downturn.


 
Public Health Working Session

10:30 AM -

 12:00 PM


Innovation for Global Health: Leveraging Advances in Technology

The technology revolution is sparking a global health revolution as well. With more than four billion mobile phones alone throughout the world, those in remote and resource-poor settings can often have the same access to information as those on the more prosperous side of the digital divide. In the public health field, new initiatives in low-cost technology – including text messages, open-source software, and social media – have just begun to tap into this potential. This session will explore how students and universities can push forward the adaptation and adoption of low-cost, innovative technology solutions that are being used to address health challenges around the globe.


 
Skill Session

10:30 AM -

 12:00 PM


Creating Buzz: Using Social Media to Market Your Cause

Beyond a quick press release or an article in the school newspaper, what are some creative ways to raise the profile of the work done by CGI U members? How can individuals be engaged to participate or contribute to a cause? This session will address both traditional marketing and media strategies and successful new media and digital organizing strategies, including web and film.


 

From the Bottom Up: Grassroots Community Engagement

How do you work with communities instead of for them? This skill session will focus on commitments that work within underserved communities on both a domestic and global level. Discussions will focus on developing projects in a culture-specific context, creating community-based approaches in partnership with local leadership, and other challenges specific to community engagement.


 

Raising Money for Your Commitment

This session will explore the resources available to commitment-makers in order to secure funding for their respective projects. Key themes of this skill session will include effective and innovative fundraising and marketing strategies, social media tools, available funding opportunities, and grant writing skills.


 

The Next Step: Moving from Idea to Action

This session is geared towards individuals in the early stages of their CGI U commitments. Former CGI U commitment-makers will guide attendees through the process of turning a commitment from vision to implementation, while discussing knowledge building, partnerships, fundraising strategies, and other relevant skills needed to develop a successful commitment.


 

12:15 PM -

 12:45 PM


Office Hours

Office Hours are sessions where attendees can directly connect with speakers and engage in discussions beyond the plenary and working sessions. These in-depth conversations will enable attendees to gain inspiration and insight from CGI U’s speakers, who will share their personal stories or elaborate on comments made during the panel discussions. Attendees will also be able to share their own commitments and experiences and seek specific advice on commitments. Each 30-minute session will provide an intimate setting for up to fifteen attendees to meet with a speaker and engage in an open Q&A discussion.


 

12:30 PM -

 2:00 PM


CGI U Exchange Fair and Attendee Lunch

CGI U Exchange is a forum for students and youth organizations to showcase their projects and accomplishments. This exhibition event is the ideal opportunity to learn about commitments, explore partnerships and network with other members.

All members are welcome to attend CGI U Exchange. Lunch will be provided at the Exchange fair.


 

12:45 PM -

 1:15 PM


Office Hours

Office Hours are sessions where attendees can directly connect with speakers and engage in discussions beyond the plenary and working sessions. These in-depth conversations will enable attendees to gain inspiration and insight from CGI U’s speakers, who will share their personal stories or elaborate on comments made during the panel discussions. Attendees will also be able to share their own commitments and experiences and seek specific advice on commitments. Each 30-minute session will provide an intimate setting for up to fifteen attendees to meet with a speaker and engage in an open Q&A discussion.


 

1:15 PM -

 1:45 PM


Office Hours

Office Hours are sessions where attendees can directly connect with speakers and engage in discussions beyond the plenary and working sessions. These in-depth conversations will enable attendees to gain inspiration and insight from CGI U’s speakers, who will share their personal stories or elaborate on comments made during the panel discussions. Attendees will also be able to share their own commitments and experiences and seek specific advice on commitments. Each 30-minute session will provide an intimate setting for up to fifteen attendees to meet with a speaker and engage in an open Q&A discussion.


 

1:45 PM -

 2:15 PM


Office Hours

Office Hours are sessions where attendees can directly connect with speakers and engage in discussions beyond the plenary and working sessions. These in-depth conversations will enable attendees to gain inspiration and insight from CGI U’s speakers, who will share their personal stories or elaborate on comments made during the panel discussions. Attendees will also be able to share their own commitments and experiences and seek specific advice on commitments. Each 30-minute session will provide an intimate setting for up to fifteen attendees to meet with a speaker and engage in an open Q&A discussion.


 
Plenary Session

2:30 PM -

 3:30 PM


The Future of Water

Many of the planet’s most urgent crises – and most promising solutions – are tied to a single substance: water. Access to clean water is a critical ingredient for economic empowerment, food security, public health, and even political stability. Yet a global water crisis is already underway. According to the World Health Organization, more than 1.2 billion people do not have access to clean water. Furthermore, every year water-related diseases are responsible for more than 3.5 million deaths, 98 percent of which occur in the developing world. With water consumption far outpacing population growth around the globe, many believe that water will become the oil of the 21st century: increasingly scarce and increasingly expensive. This panel will highlight innovative ways that students and universities can take action to create sustainable water, sanitation, and food systems around the world.


 
Education Working Session

4:00 PM -

 5:30 PM


Overcoming the Toughest Obstacles: Education for the Most Disadvantaged Children and Youth

Many children face insurmountable challenges that keep them from attending school. The hurdles these youth face include gender discrimination, forced labor, armed conflict, disabilities, gang violence, lack of parental support, HIV/AIDS, and natural disasters. It is estimated that of the world’s 218 million child laborers, 166 million are between the ages of 5 and 14. There are at least 25 million out-of-school children living in low-income countries affected by conflict, and around 14 million children between the ages of 5 and 17 who have been forcibly displaced by conflict into education systems that lack the most basic education services. This panel will highlight both the challenges faced and the successes achieved by innovative programs and determined individuals working to expand access to education worldwide. Panelists will focus on specific actions and interventions that students and universities can take to ensure that the most vulnerable and disadvantaged have the opportunity to get an education and build a brighter future.


 
Environment & Climate Change Working Session

4:00 PM -

 5:30 PM


Leapfrogging Dirty Habits: Overcoming Energy Poverty

An estimated 1.6 billion people, many of them in rural regions of sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, do not have access to electricity. Instead, many households turn to biomass to fuel their stoves. But the black carbon particulate emissions from these stoves are not only a major driver of climate change, but a severe respiratory health risk as well. The World Health Organization estimates that 1.6 million people die annually from the adverse effects of indoor air pollution. The challenge to provide modern, clean, and affordable energy services while creating global economic opportunity is significant. Many low-cost, clean energy technologies exist but have not yet been implemented on a meaningful scale. How can young people and the higher education community identify and disseminate these emerging eco-technologies, particularly in existing areas of energy poverty? This session will feature scalable student and university initiatives that provide sustainable energy services and economic opportunities where they are needed the most.


 
Peace & Human Rights Working Session

4:00 PM -

 5:30 PM


Tweeting the Globe: Using Technology to Promote Democracy and Human Rights

With over 350 million active Facebook users and over 20 million unique visitors on Twitter, online social networks hold a wealth of potential for mass mobilization for human rights. Last June, the world watched in awe as Iranians relied primarily on Twitter to organize and communicate with the outside world during the protests over the disputed elections. And with the fastest growing mobile market in the world in Africa, the creative applications of mobile technology for information sharing, election monitoring, and grassroots reporting are endless. These applications enable individuals and organizations both onsite and abroad to monitor abuses, conduct far-reaching education and advocacy campaigns, mobilize constituents, and empower those in need. This session will examine ways in which social media tools like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Flickr can continue to revolutionize students’ ability to communicate, mobilize, and promote human rights.


 
Poverty Alleviation Working Session

4:00 PM -

 5:30 PM


Agents of Change: Alleviating Poverty through Social Entrepreneurship

When it comes to poverty alleviation, people around the world are increasingly looking to social entrepreneurship to guide their efforts. From the Grameen Bank to the hundreds of student-led startups on campus, social entrepreneurs are identifying problems and developing innovative, market-based solutions to address them. The U.S. government has pledged over $50 million each year to fund the innovative work of social entrepreneurs, and other sectors are following suit. Sites such as Twitter and Facebook are helping to generate excitement around outside-the-box poverty alleviation efforts and enabling many to “go viral.” This panel will highlight the work of leading social entrepreneurs both on campus and in the community, and will explore the skills they have and the tools they use to successfully pursue promising solutions to nearly every facet of poverty.


 
Public Health Working Session

4:00 PM -

 5:30 PM


The Push for Proximity: Mobilizing Communities to Action for Health

All health is local. To improve health within a community, residents must be empowered to be catalysts of change.. The importance of community health programs in developing countries is often overlooked and underfunded. As a result, very little is offered in the way of health education or prevention. This problem is compounded by the fact that most communities are faced with unequal access to primary health care and escalating out-of-pocket expenses for treatment. This session will focus on the tools and strategies of successful community health initiatives that have created local leaders and ownership by engaging community members to assess what is needed, what is wanted, and what can be done. Panelists will discuss new and innovative models developed by young leaders and universities striving to create sustainable, replicable community-based programs.


 
Skill Session

4:00 PM -

 5:30 PM


Creating Buzz: Using Social Media to Market Your Cause

Beyond a quick press release or an article in the school newspaper, what are some creative ways to raise the profile of the work done by CGI U members? How can individuals be engaged to participate or contribute to a cause? This session will address both traditional marketing and media strategies and successful new media and digital organizing strategies, including web and film.


 

From the Bottom Up: Grassroots Community Engagement

How do you work with communities instead of for them? This skill session will focus on commitments that work within underserved communities on both a domestic and global level. Discussions will focus on developing projects in a culture-specific context, creating community-based approaches in partnership with local leadership, and other challenges specific to community engagement.


 

Raising Money for Your Commitment

This session will explore the resources available to commitment-makers in order to secure funding for their respective projects. Key themes of this skill session will include effective and innovative fundraising and marketing strategies, social media tools, available funding opportunities, and grant writing skills.


 

The Next Step: Moving from Idea to Action

This session is geared towards individuals in the early stages of their CGI U commitments. Former commitment-makers will guide attendees through the process of turning a commitment from vision to implementation, while discussing knowledge building, partnerships, fundraising strategies, and other relevant skills needed to develop a successful commitment.


 
University President and NGO Discussion

4:00 PM -

 5:30 PM


Empowering the Next Generation of Global Citizens

Institutions of higher education and non-profit organizations play a vital role in addressing some of the world’s most pressing issues. Through innovative research, cutting-edge curricula, and public service initiatives, each of these sectors can develop creative and effective solutions to global and domestic problems. Yet there is still enormous potential for further collaboration. University presidents can play a critical role in creating innovative campus programs and curricula that make a tangible difference outside the classroom. How can universities do more to not only teach young people about the issues affecting the world, but to develop and produce the next generation of global citizens? How can they work with non-profits to accomplish this? This session will bring together university presidents and non-profit leaders to identify strategic opportunities for collaboration.


 
Closing Plenary

6:00 PM -

 7:00 PM


Moving Forward in Haiti

Michele Norris will host a conversation with President Clinton and other guests on the recovery and reconstruction efforts underway in Haiti, and how students and the university community can get involved.


 

7:00 PM -

 8:00 PM


Class Photo

Following the Closing Plenary, please remain seated in the BankUnited Center. At 7pm we will organize all 2010 attendees and take a Class Photo.


 

8:00 PM -

 10:00 PM


Closing Reception and Entertainment

On Saturday night, we will hold a Closing Reception for all members that will include a Caribbean-themed dinner and musical entertainment by Jahfé.