Agenda

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Plenary Session

9:00 AM -

 10:15 AM


Turning Landfills into Goldmines: Can We Make the Circular Economy a Reality?

Clothes, cars, chow. Every day, products and services are consumed based on supply chains that run in only one direction: from producer, to consumer, to waste. We consume the world’s natural resources far faster than they can be renewed, and as the population will grow to 8 billion by the year 2030, we will need the resources of two Earths to satisfy our consumption. To prepare for the Earth’s future, we must shift to circular economies—models that are multidirectional, restorative, and regenerative by design. Circular economies will not only disrupt the way we produce, consume, and dispose of products, but they could spur the creation of highly valuable new businesses and environmentally sustainable societies. These economies could add another $1 trillion a year for the global economy in as few as 10 years.

In this session, leaders from the private, public, and nonprofit sectors will discuss how CGI members can:

• Redesign corporate supply chain strategies to implement reusing and recycling methods that create financial and environmental gains and true value for communities.
• Deploy innovative financing to invest in and scale promising circular ventures that create jobs.
• Utilize new technologies and big data to support supply chain transparency and changes in consumer behavior.

Speakers:

William A. McDonough, Chief Executive, McDonough Innovation
Andrew Puddicombe, Co-Founder, Headspace

Panel Discussion:

Moderator:

Mindy Lubber, President, Ceres

Panelists:

Stacey Davidson, Director, Redisa
Ron Gonen, Co-founder and Managing Director, Closed Loop Partners
Paul Polman, Chief Executive Officer, Unilever

 
Breakout Sessions

10:30 AM -

 12:00 PM


Bridging the Health Funding Gap

Despite worldwide health care spending reaching an all-time high of more than $7.6 trillion annually, millions of people continue to die from preventable causes, such as childbirth and diarrhea. Due to population growth and the increasing burden of noncommunicable diseases, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease, global health care expenditures will continue to grow. Emerging economies, like those of Ethiopia and India, will grow at a rate of over 10 percent per year in the coming decade—nearly three times faster than in developed countries. With these challenges in mind, governments and businesses will need to work together to structure and make investments that deliver improved health outcomes while creating business value.

In this session, leaders from the private, public, and nonprofit sectors will discuss how CGI members can:

• Increase public-private partnerships and private investments to deploy new, innovative, and flexible sources of health care financing—such as insurance products, development impact and pandemic bonds, and product development partnerships.
• Invest in successful business models built on shared value to manufacture and deliver scalable health care services, products, and technologies to low-income and vulnerable populations.

Moderator:

Chelsea Clinton, Vice Chair, Clinton Foundation

Panel Discussion:

Panelists:

Kesetebirhan Admasu, Minister of Health, Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia
Ray Chambers, UN Secretary-General's Special Envoy for Health in Agenda 2030 and for Malaria, Office of the UN Special Envoy
Matt Lilley, Chief Executive Officer, Africa, Prudential plc
Zouera Youssoufou, Managing Director and CEO, Dangote Foundation

 

Innovating the Global Food Supply Chain

While the world has made tremendous progress in reducing extreme hunger, total success is hindered by harmful practices such as land mismanagement, use of low-quality seeds and topsoil, and supply chain inefficiencies. Today, 795 million people are undernourished while 1.3 billion tons of food are wasted annually. Smallholder farmers—80 percent of whom are women—produce over half of the world’s food supply, yet most live on wages of less than $2 a day. To overcome these remaining challenges, innovations can be incorporated at every stage of the global food supply chain. Innovations, such as affordable drones used to monitor crop health, can increase crop yield, durability, and nutrition while decreasing environmental degradation, improving livelihoods for smallholder farmers, and achieving food security for all.

In this session, leaders from the private, public, and nonprofit sectors will discuss how CGI members can:

• Develop and finance technologies and techniques that improve yields, nutrition, and profit.
• Expand growth opportunities for smallholder farmers to include credit, savings, and insurance products.
• Reduce food and environmental waste through innovation in cold chains and integrated distribution channels.
• Invest in women-friendly farming techniques and technology that supports women’s land and water rights.

Moderator:

Raj Kumar, President and Editor-in-Chief, Devex

Participants:

Ertharin Cousin, Executive Director, World Food Programme
T R Kesavan, Chief Operating Officer, Tractors and Farm Equipment Limited
Zia Khan, Vice President, Initiatives & Strategy, The Rockefeller Foundation

 
Small Group Discussions

10:30 AM -

 12:00 PM


Inclusion & Opportunity: Breaking Down Identity-Based Social & Economic Exclusion

In recent years, transformational gains have been made around the world in creating more inclusive cultures and workplaces. For example, in 2015, the United States legalized same-sex marriages and 11 major international companies signed the newly created Global Business and Disability Network Charter. McKinsey & Company reports that companies with gender, ethnic, and racial diversity are at least 15 percent more likely to experience above-average financial returns. While many individuals and organizations are working to expand the inclusion of those excluded by economic, social, and political systems, the world is also experiencing increasing identity-based strife and violence. Research indicates that inclusive societies have greater productivity, well-being, and social cohesion. Yet it will take effort to change current systems so they are equally beneficial to all.

In this session, participants will:

• Discuss opportunities to engage corporations, educational institutions, the health care community, and individuals working in the arts to advance cultural and workplace inclusion.
• Share best practices and lessons learned for inclusion from across a multitude of sectors and a variety of approaches.
• Strategize how to promote the social and economic benefits of a more inclusive society.

Moderator:

Maria Figueroa Kupcu, Partner, Brunswick Group

Participants:

Loreen Arbus, President, The Loreen Arbus Foundation
Dafna Lifshitz, Chief Executive Officer, Appleseeds Academy

 

Preparing Reliable and Secure Energy Solutions for Climate Change Adaptation

Energy producers, suppliers, and distributors deliver life-sustaining and life-saving energy services every minute of every day. As the world experiences climate-related shifts, including changing weather patterns and rising sea levels, energy resources and infrastructure are often severely impacted. Although not traditionally considered part of emergency response teams, energy companies are changing the paradigm by exploring ways to shore up energy infrastructure and secure energy resources. Many utilities and power producers have already invested in innovative improvements that ensure continual power delivery and rapid power recovery during and after extreme weather and damaging geologic events. In addition, in places where power grids are most vulnerable or non-existent, distributed and renewable energy technology companies are poised to provide back-up and off-grid energy solutions.

In this session, participants will:

• Explore opportunities for collaboration on the design and transfer of simple, scalable energy solutions that address climate change adaptation and disaster preparedness.
• Discuss how to develop new solutions and adapt existing technologies for specific climates and geographies in order to increase secure, transportable, and back-up energy solutions around the world.
• Share lessons learned from existing efforts and methods for their application across the energy industry.

Participants:

Meagan Fallone, Chief Executive Officer, Barefoot College International
Stephan Ouaknine, Managing Partner, Inerjys Ventures
Andrea Valcalda, Head of Sustainability, Enel

 

The Case for Childcare: A Shared Responsibility

A 2015 McKinsey Global Initiative report found that if women played an identical role to men in labor markets, as much as $28 trillion—or 26 percent—could be added to global annual GDP by 2025. Even with this potential, the gender gap in the workforce has barely changed over the last 20 years. One barrier to women’s full participation in the global economy is the disproportionate amount of time women spend on unpaid household and care work. While “care” includes a wide spectrum of activities, investing in childcare in particular can help to achieve a triple bottom line—fostering women’s economic empowerment, contributing to positive developmental outcomes for young children, and supporting business performance through increased employee productivity, lower turnover, and reduced absenteeism. Governments, employers, childcare centers, and families each have a role to play in supporting childcare services.

In this session, participants will:

• Discuss the business case for childcare, as well as developments in this space.
• Share best practices and lessons learned for how to effectively provide comprehensive care solutions.
• Consider how to actualize the shared responsibility of childcare in varied geographies and settings.

Participants:

Kweilin Ellingrud, Partner and Co-author of Power of Parity, McKinsey and Company

 

The Future of STEM Education—Closing the Equity Gap

STEM jobs are growing faster than any other sector of the U.S. economy, and demand for core STEM competencies is intensifying across all industries. Equipping students with critical STEM skills will fuel innovation and increase economic opportunity and social mobility for millions of young Americans. Despite significant strides in expanding access to STEM education, structural disparities in both participation and academic achievement persist, with women and historically underrepresented minorities being disproportionately affected. For instance, only 57 percent of African American students, 67 percent of Hispanic students, and fewer than half of American Indian and Native Alaskan students have access to the full range of math and science courses in their high schools. In our knowledge-based economy, access to rigorous STEM education is not only an economic imperative, but a social justice issue.

In this session, leaders from the private, public, and nonprofit sectors will:

• Identify critical barriers inhibiting underrepresented groups from engaging and thriving in STEM fields.
• Explore strategies to expand access to high-quality STEM learning opportunities—in and out of school.
• Discuss best practices and lessons learned from innovative CGI Commitments to Action to broaden participation in STEM and explore opportunities to build on those initiatives.

Moderator:

Melissa Moritz, Deputy Director of STEM, U.S. Department of Education

 

The Power of Partnership: Goal 17 and Advancing Global Transformation

Last September, 193 United Nations (UN) Member States adopted 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with the aim of eradicating poverty, ensuring environmental sustainability, and guaranteeing global prosperity by 2030. Recognizing that achieving these goals will require cooperation among diverse entities, Goal 17 is devoted entirely to fostering critical partnerships among government, the private sector, and civil society. Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) members have long been working across sectors, geographies, and at various scales to address issues relevant to the SDGs. The CGI model’s inherent emphasis on partnership uniquely positions members to be a transformative force in implementing the SDGs over the next 14 years.

In this session, participants will:

• Discuss interdisciplinary Commitments to Action with robust partnerships that have the capacity to deliver impact across a variety of issue areas.
• Examine the unique contributions the CGI community can make to fulfill the new UN Agenda for Sustainable Development by 2030.
• Generate collective investment in the SDGs to promote a future of shared prosperity.


 
Networking Event

12:30 PM -

 1:30 PM


Networking Lunch

This informal networking opportunity will allow members to sample from a number of tasting menus featuring locally sourced and sustainable food options, while making connections with fellow meeting attendees.


 
Breakout Sessions

2:00 PM -

 3:30 PM


Achieving Universal Quality Education

All children have the right to an education—a quality education. But how can we ensure this right is extended universally?

While a quality education requires a holistic approach—including components such as student nutrition and health, safe school environments, and well-trained teachers—a truly well-rounded approach must be adaptable to diverse geographies and cultures. During this session, thought leaders from around the world will discuss actionable strategies to increase and improve educational quality and highlight the importance of education plans that can be supported by the private sector, public sector, and civil society.

Panel Discussion:

Moderator:

Chernor Bah, Associate, Population Council

Panelists:

Alice P. Albright, Chief Executive Officer, Global Partnership for Education
Elias N. Bou Saab, Minister of Education and Higher Education, Lebanon
Gus Schmedlen, Vice President, Worldwide Education, HP

 

Connectivity

Technology is one of the defining forces of our collective future, reshaping the way we learn, innovate, and connect with one another. Today, new digital technologies and advancements—such as the Internet of Things, smart devices, artificial intelligence, and the block chain—are increasingly changing the concept of connectivity itself and enhancing our ability to maximize human potential. The strategies we design and the investments we make will impact how equitably access to these innovations is shared—and how drastically livelihoods will be improved as a result.

How can we bridge the digital divide of today and harness the potential of connectivity to impact our societies, environment, and economies of tomorrow?

Moderator:

Manoush Zomorodi, Host and Managing Editor of Note to Self, WNYC Studios, New York Public Radio

Participants:

Hernando de Soto, Chairman, Institute for Liberty and Democracy
Njideka Harry, President and CEO, Youth for Technology Foundation
Vivienne Ming, Co-Founder and Managing Partner, Socos
Jamie Smith, Global Chief Communications Officer, The Bitfury Group

 
Small Group Discussions

2:00 PM -

 3:30 PM


 

Combating Teen Pregnancy, Cervical Cancer, and HIV in Caribbean Girls & Women

Many girls and women in the Caribbean are facing health crises—HIV/AIDS is the leading cause of death among young women in the region, cervical cancer (a vaccine-preventable disease) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among Caribbean women aged 15 to 49, and an estimated 20 percent of Caribbean women give birth before the age of 19. In Jamaica, for example, 72 out of every 1,000 girls aged 15 to 19 have given birth, and this number jumps to 90 in the Dominican Republic. In 2015, the Government of Jamaica and the United Nations Population Fund—with additional partners including Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Heads of Government—committed to address these health challenges by implementing and testing a pilot project with the goals of reducing teenage pregnancy, preventing cervical cancer, and eliminating mother-to-child transmission of HIV/AIDS across four regions in Jamaica. This Commitment to Action will fulfill these goals by improving access to health services, training health care workers, supporting legislative advocacy, and creating public awareness and education campaigns in all Caribbean nations.

In this session, CGI members will:

• Discuss how to support CGI commitment-makers working on girls' and women’s health in the Caribbean through financial resources and supplies, commodities, and pharmaceuticals.
• Explore technical expertise that can benefit government, policy, pilot implementation, and scaling across the Caribbean.
• Examine culturally relevant media and communications strategies, which are important vehicles for educating parents and young people about the benefits of both prevention and care seeking.

Participants:

Sandra Granger, First Lady, Guyana
Timothy Harris, Prime Minister, Saint Kitts and Nevis
Babatunde Osotimehin, Executive Director, United Nations Population Fund

 

Social Enterprise: Measuring Impact in an Emerging Sector

Social enterprises, mission-driven organizations that use business models in their work, are expected to deliver a more diverse set of returns than standard businesses and non-profit organizations. While a business is primarily concerned with return on investment, a social enterprise must also balance social and environmental impact in their core programs. Measuring this impact is critical; it is essential for effective business management and resource allocation, and investors are unlikely to accept a lower financial return unless there are measurable impacts in areas like education, sustainability, or health. However, measuring the success of social enterprises and reporting these metrics is time-consuming and expensive, creating yet another barrier to entry for social entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurs and investors alike need help navigating the measurement frameworks and identifying best practices for social enterprise.

In this session, participants will:

• Discuss best practices for measurement and assess existing frameworks like Impact Reporting & Investment Standards (IRIS).
• Examine the methods for reporting metrics to stakeholders and expanding transparency in the social enterprise space.


 

The Foundational Benefits of Access to Basic Human Rights

Access to education and health care is instrumental in creating better futures for individuals around the world. However, even more fundamental human rights—such as rights to property and personal security, freedom from bondage, and environmental security—must first be secured for other transformative rights to be realized. Individuals working on the front lines to solve these core issues by giving a voice to underserved communities or speaking out against environmental violations ensure that other interventions, such as educational and health systems, can thrive. However, community leaders often find themselves as targets of threats, intimidation, or violence. How can CGI members dedicated to advancing social and environmental causes in communities worldwide engage local activists at the vanguard of promising movements, understand how to leverage their efforts in their own work, and work together to achieve shared outcomes?

In this session, participants will:

• Meet human rights defenders and hear stories about their on-the-ground work and the challenges they face.
• Discuss opportunities to develop effective partnerships and mutually beneficial approaches.
• Explore how to enhance their own work through the realization of environmental justice, women’s equality, and human rights.


 

The Future of Work: Adapting for the Freelance Economy

By 2020, more than 40 percent of the American workforce will be considered either freelancers, contractors, or temporary workers. Globally, workforce trends indicate a similar trajectory. As work increasingly shifts away from full-time, long-term jobs to contract positions, millions of workers will experience career instability and the loss of protections and benefits, like the health care and retirement contributions that middle-income jobs have traditionally provided. However, proponents of the growing “sharing” or “gig” economy—the piecing together of various part-time opportunities, such as food delivery and ride sharing enabled by new technology platforms—argue that career flexibility empowers citizens and creates jobs. The freelance economy also attracts populations that have been disadvantaged in the labor market, such as millions of opportunity youth and long-term unemployed workers aged 50 and older.

Participants in this session will:

• Explore what work will look like in the years to come and how to prepare for jobs of the future.
• Examine the challenges and opportunities that the evolving freelance economy presents.
• Use the growing U.S. freelance economy as a case study in understanding how work is changing.

Moderator:

Bruce Reed, Co-Founder and CEO, Civic

Participants:

Matthew Bishop, Senior editor, The Economist Group
Leila Janah, Founder and CEO, Sama and Lxmi
Kim Rubey, Global Head of Philathropy and Social Good, Airbnb

 

2:30 PM -

 4:00 PM


Elephants Action Network: Impact through Collaborative Conservation

Established in 2013, the Elephants Action Network (EAN) was created in response to a sweeping poaching crisis that, without strategic intervention, may render African elephants extinct within the next decade. Through the EAN, the CGI community has collectively mobilized against the killing of elephants, the trafficking of tusks, and the demand for ivory products. These efforts have thoughtfully approached the economic, environmental, and security challenges associated with wildlife trafficking and consistently targeted long-term impact. EAN Commitments to Action have deployed a wide array of approaches to support elephant conservation, from significant expansion of critical habitats to the bolstering of law enforcement capabilities and demand reduction initiatives.

Members of the CGI EAN community will celebrate the landmark accomplishments and successful commitments within the three pillars of the Elephants Action Network, as well as:

• Discuss past challenges and successes for the EAN community.
• Explore best practices for engaging stakeholders across sectors in elephant conservation and anti-ivory trafficking initiatives.
• Identify a new structure for the Action Network beginning in 2017, as well as priority areas that can be maximized via the EAN’s approach and model beyond the 2016 Annual Meeting.


 
Closing Plenary Session

4:00 PM -

 5:30 PM


Closing Plenary Session: Imagine All the People

Imagine that you were born in the midst of a civil war, into bonded labor, or an overcrowded refugee camp. Imagine how the circumstances of your birth—your zip code, gender, or ethnicity—would severely restrict your opportunities. For too many this is not imagined, but a reality. As CGI members, we seek to create unrestricted opportunities for all. To succeed, we must imagine ourselves as others—internalizing the challenges facing people who are born into circumstances different from our own. We must commit our hearts and minds to effective empathy, cooperation, and action to create peace and prosperity for people everywhere. This session will explore the nature and science of empathy and imagine how each of us can apply it to our own work and lives.

Remarks:

Chelsea Clinton, Vice Chair, Clinton Foundation
Donnel Baird, Chief Executive Officer, BlocPower
Bill Clinton, Founding Chairman, Clinton Global Initiative, 42nd President of the United States

Moderator:

Uzodinma Iweala, Co-Founder, Editor-In-Chief, and CEO, Ventures Africa Magazine

Participants:

Ben Affleck, Actor, Filmmaker and Founder, Eastern Congo Initiative
Chouchou Namegabe, Founding Member, South Kivu Women's Media Association