Agenda

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Networking Event

8:00 AM -

 8:45 AM


Breakfast

 
Plenary Session

9:00 AM -

 10:15 AM


ON THE MOVE: CREATING OPPORTUNITY FOR MIGRANTS AND REFUGEES

More than 250 million people live outside their country of birth, often bringing the high-level skills and knowledge that foster innovation and economic growth to their adopted communities. While the majority are migrants in search of new economic opportunities, wars, persecution, and climate change have forced more people to flee their homes and seek refuge elsewhere than at any other time in recorded history. This influx has given rise to xenophobia, calls for tightening borders, and hostility towards those trying to rebuild their lives outside their communities of origin. Students and universities play an integral role in dispelling discrimination and negative perceptions by creating more supportive, socially-inclusive environments for refugees and migrants. In this session, panelists will explore how CGI U commitment-makers can:

• Improve the quality of immediate humanitarian assistance for refugees, while ensuring a safe and effective long-term refugee resettlement process,
• Equip refugees and migrants with access to capital and the necessary training to become successful entrepreneurs and innovators themselves, while convincing more people in host communities of the benefits of these measures, and
• Increase access to quality education worldwide, from Syrians in refugee camps to DREAMers on U.S. campuses.

Panel Discussion:

Moderator:

Rachel E. Rosenbloom, Professor of Law, Northeastern University School of Law

Participants:

Madeleine K. Albright, Former Secretary of State; Chair, Albright Stonebridge Group; Chair, National Democratic Institute, Albright Stonebridge Group and National Democratic Institute
Sarahi Espinoza Salamanca, Founder and CEO, Dreamers Roadmap
David Miliband, President and CEO, International Rescue Committee

 
Skill Sessions

10:45 AM -

 12:00 PM


Creating Buzz: Using Technology to Expand Your Impact

Beyond a quick press release or an article in the school newspaper, what are some creative ways to raise the profile of the work done by CGI U members ? How can the internet expand community engagement and participation with CGI U commitments? This session will explore traditional marketing and media campaigns, along with a wide range of digital storytelling and organizing strategies.

Panel Discussion:

Moderator:

Max Schorr, Co-Founder & Executive Chairman, GOOD

Participants:

Lennon Flowers, Co-founder and Executive Director, The Dinner Party
Peter L. Hopkins, President and Co-Founder, Big Think
Anndrea Moore, Founder and CEO, Black Tech Women

 

Designing a Meaningful Project

How can CGI U students design thoughtful and impactful projects as they set out to tackle some of the world’s most pressing challenges? Participants in this session will learn to approach commitment design through a community-driven and constituent-informed lens focusing on ideation, solutions engineering, and learning and refinement. This session is intended for students interested in mastering critical design practices prior to embarking on project implementation.

Panel Discussion:

Moderator:

Luis Perez-Breva, Faculty Director MIT Innovation Teams, MIT

Participants:

Angelo Bechara, Year 3 Winner, Up to Us
Vanessa Kirsch, Founder and CEO, New Profit
Tiffany Pham, Founder and CEO, Mogul
Susan Windham-Bannister, President and CEO, Biomedical Growth Strategies

 

Monitoring and Evaluating Your Results

How can CGI U participants ensure that their commitments are achieving tangible progress and fulfilling their mission? Discussions will explore measurement and evaluation methods that can enhance the quality and effectiveness of commitments, enable attendees to identify potential design flaws, and build upon existing strategies to maximize outcomes and inform future efforts. This session is intended for students looking to use data to inform strategy and improve impact.

Panel Discussion:

Moderator:

Rebecca Riccio, Founding Director, Social Impact Lab, Northeastern University

Participants:

Shabana Basij-Rasikh, President and Co-founder, School of Leadership, Afghanistan (SOLA)
Esther Ngumbi, Postdoctoral Researcher, Auburn University

 

Raising Money for Your Commitment

How can CGI U students best access and leverage the funding opportunities and resources available to them? Participants will learn to navigate traditional, grant-based funding streams as well as maximize the benefits of online fundraising tools, social media, and other digital marketing platforms. This session is intended for students who want to hone their skills in pitch-making and establish enduring connections with potential funders.

Panel Discussion:

Moderator:

Margaret A. McKenna, President Emerita, Lesley University

Participants:

Karim Abouelnaga, Founder and CEO, Practice Makes Perfect
Stephanie Dodson, Managing Director, Draper Richards Kaplan Foundation
Tina Hovsepian, Founder, Cardborigami

 

Strengthening Organizational Capacity

Limited personnel and organizational capacity can significantly reduce the ability of CGI U participants to carry out their commitments and bring them to scale. This session will introduce strategies for managing and building a staff as well as recruiting, organizing, and retaining an engaged volunteer team. In addition, students will learn how to expand their reach and impact by identifying and securing partnerships with a wide range of campus and community partners.

Panel Discussion:

Moderator:

David Gergen, Faculty Director, Center for Public Leadership, Harvard Kennedy School

Participants:

Alessandra Brown, Director, Roxbury Innovation Center
Shana Dressler, Co-Founder, NYC Innovation Collective
Noorain Khan, Program Officer, Ford Foundation
Alan Khazei, Founder and CEO, Be The Change Inc.

 
Office Hours

12:15 PM -

 1:00 PM


Office Hours with Select Program Participants

Office hours allow attendees to directly connect with program participants and special guests, who share their personal stories or elaborate on comments made during the panel discussions. Attendees can also share their own questions and thoughts, and seek specific advice on commitments.


 
Networking Event

12:15 PM -

 1:30 PM


Lunch

 
Office Hours

1:00 PM -

 1:45 PM


Office Hours with Select Program Participants

Office hours allow attendees to directly connect with program participants and special guests, who share their personal stories or elaborate on comments made during the panel discussions. Attendees can also share their own questions and thoughts, and seek specific advice on commitments.


 
Plenary Session

2:00 PM -

 3:15 PM


MAKING IT: DESIGNING A HEALTHY AND SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

Innovations in social media, mobile technology, robotics, and artificial intelligence have fundamentally transformed our lives and the way we interact with each other. By 2050, affordable housing could be built by 3D printers, drones could deliver clean water or life-saving medicines, and renewables could be our biggest energy source. Yet projections also point to a world where atmospheric carbon dioxide levels will have doubled since the pre-industrial era, where natural resources are strained by a population of almost 10 billion, where rising temperatures and a lack of sanitation increases the risk of tropical diseases, and where a growing climate refugee crisis threatens to create a generation of children deprived of the skills or opportunity to fulfill their potential. To address these existential challenges, a new generation of innovators, entrepreneurs, and creative problem-solvers are developing new models for carbon neutrality, from residential solar to fuel-efficient transportation. They are harnessing the power of design to build responsive and resilient health delivery systems. In this session, panelists will explore how students and universities can:

• Establish courses, academic programs, labs, and maker-spaces focused on climate change and public health, where hands-on experience is required, unconventional thinking is encouraged, and collaboration is critical,
• Incentivize discovery, invention, and innovation among students through a wide range of seed funding challenges, pitch competitions, and mentorship opportunities, and
• Ensure that a culture of sustainable design is democratized across universities and geographies, rooted in full community participation and real-world results.

Panel Discussion:

Moderator:

Chelsea Clinton, Vice Chair, Clinton Foundation

Participants:

Ayah Bdeir, Founder and CEO, littleBits
Paul E. Farmer, Chief Strategist and Co-Founder, Partners In Health; Kolokotrones University Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Chief of Division of Global Health Equity, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Partners In Health; Harvard Medical School; Brigham and Women's Hospital
Lisa Jackson, VP, Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives, Apple
Samantha Marquez, Innovator and Activist, Yale University
Vivek Murthy, 19th Surgeon General of the United States
Dr. M. Sanjayan, CEO, Conservation International

 
Working Sessions

3:45 PM -

 5:00 PM


Addressing Youth Homelessness in the U.S.

On any given night, there are more than 500,000 Americans living on the streets, in emergency housing, or in homeless shelters. Twenty-three percent of them are young people under 18, and nine percent are between the ages of 18-24. Many of these youth have fled family trauma or sexual abuse, have aged out of foster care, or have been thrown out of their homes because they identify as gay or transgender. In response, a wide range of social enterprises, volunteer networks, and public-private partnerships are launching initiatives to better address the complex needs of this population. In addition to providing short-term emergency shelter, advocates are looking to connect youth with trauma-informed and gender-responsive services, mental health counseling, and programs that help adolescents stay in school, graduate from high school, and access financial aid for college. In this session, panelists and CGI U commitment-makers will explore how to:

• Ensure that vulnerable youth and their families have access to permanent supportive housing, in order to provide health care, education, and job training services in addition to immediate shelter,
• Create individualized, needs-based mentorship programs that are relevant to homeless youth and those transitioning out of the foster care system, and
• Expand services and support networks that can enable homeless youth to reunite with their families, including crisis hotlines, street outreach programs, transportation vouchers, and in-home family counseling.

Panel Discussion:

Moderator:

Elisabeth Jackson, Executive Director, Bridge Over Troubled Waters

Participants:

Mariuma Ben Yosef, Founder and C.E.O, Shanti House Association
Sixto Cancel, CEO, Think of Us
Nan Roman, President, National Alliance to End Homelessness

 

Is the Sharing Economy Sustainable?

The sharing economy has transformed our everyday lives, redefining the way we travel, access capital, purchase goods, and even eat a meal. Advocates believe that the sharing economy is not only more efficient but can also create more social and environmental impact. Carpooling networks can reduce carbon emissions and reduce transportation costs; entrepreneurs can receive peer-to-peer loans at lower rates than traditional banks; and free online courses and open data sets can democratize access to educational tools and information. Yet an increasing emphasis on access over ownership does not always lead to more sustainable outcomes or long-term behavior changes. Critics argue that the sharing economy often boosts financial insecurity and weakens the social safety net by creating a new class of part-time, low-paid jobs without traditional employee benefits. Others maintain that the sharing economy is really an access economy, providing easier access to other people’s goods and services rather than actually sharing them. In this session, panelists and participants will discuss:

• How the sharing economy model can scale and succeed around the world, and how it can be used to help raise living standards without reducing wages and incentivizing unsustainable consumption patterns,
• How the sharing economy can increase collaboration rather than commerce alone, and
• How peer-to-peer models can create environmental impact, ensuring that more services are provided with fewer products.

Panel Discussion:

Moderator:

Adva Saldinger, Associate Editor, Devex

Participants:

Arun Sundararajan, Professor of Business, New York University
Diana Tellefson Torres, Executive Director, UFW Foundation

 

LGBTQ Equality: Overcoming the Backlash

The LGBTQ community has made historic progress in achieving greater rights and visibility: there are now 22 countries in the world where same-sex couples can marry, up from zero in 2000. A record number of openly LGBTQ athletes participated at the 2016 Rio Olympics. Yet this progress has also yielded a disturbing backlash: in the U.S., LGBTQ people are more likely to be targets of hate crimes than any other minority group, while three in four LGBTQ students on college campuses reported experiencing sexual harassment. Internationally, 76 countries have laws against sexual relations between people of the same sex. To create and sustain more inclusive and equitable environments around the world, it is essential for communities to support victims of abuse and violence and to speak out against discrimination, homophobia, and transphobia. In this session, panelists and CGI U commitment-makers will explore how to:

• Respond effectively to discrimination, hate speech, and incidences of violence by creating an environment of safety and equality through safe spaces, support services, and displays of public solidarity with LGBTQ coalitions and ally groups,
• Develop social media tools and effective storytelling techniques that increase awareness and raise the profile of ongoing challenges and issues affecting the LGBTQ community, and
• Support efforts to promote LGBTQ rights around the world, change discriminatory laws, and amplify LGBTQ voices to move beyond established workplace protections and transform public attitudes in order to build a true culture of inclusion.

Panel Discussion:

Moderator:

Rebecca Adams, Senior Editor, Health and Sex, Refinery29

Participants:

Schuyler Bailar, Harvard Class of 2020, Harvard University
Samuel Dorison, Chief of Staff, The Trevor Project
Blair Imani, Executive Director, Equality for HER
Nadine Smith, CEO, Equality Florida

 

Preventing and Responding to Sexual Assault on Campus

Almost 20 percent of female students will experience rape or a sexual assault during their time at college, with the majority of student victims knowing their attacker. Yet under 15 percent of sexual assault victims on campus ever report the crime to law enforcement. While less common, and even more underreported, male students are also victimized. Several factors make the university environment distinct in terms of responding to and preventing sexual assault. Universities have a special responsibility to protect their students – whether in partnership with, or independent of, law enforcement. Throughout the process, they must consider the impact of an assault on the victim, the attacker and the entire school community. In this session, panelists and CGI U commitment-makers will discuss how to:

• Create a culture in which sexual assault is not tolerated, promoting effective bystander intervention, self-defense training, and access to university resources and comprehensive care that support survivors of sexual assault,
• Utilize technology designed to provide a confidential reporting platform for college sexual assault survivors and to help schools facilitate the identification of repeat assailants, and
• Ensure that campaigns and initiatives against sexual assault on campus are student-driven and rooted in the experiences and perspectives of young people.

Panel Discussion:

Moderator:

Amelia Harnish, Senior Features Writer, Refinery 29

Participants:

Kim D. Kirkland, Executive Director, Oregon State University
Amanda Nguyen, Founder and CEO, Rise
Amy Ziering, Documentary Film Maker, Chain Camera Pictures

 

Skills vs. Degrees

Post-secondary degrees are one of the best ways for a young workforce to gain marketable and employable skills in today’s global, digital economy. However, as total student debt reaches more than $1.2 trillion in the United States and rising costs of living push an increasing number of students to take out loans for basic living expenses, traditional post-secondary options may not always be the most efficient pathway to economic mobility. Proponents of traditional 4-year college degrees argue that post-secondary education enables students to think critically, communicate complex ideas, and develop long-term leadership capabilities. Yet many trade schools, community colleges, and apprenticeships are more affordable, responsive to shifts in market demand, and offer sector-specific skills and high rates of immediate job placement. In a time when the job market has become increasingly competitive and fluid, and in which artificial intelligence and advanced automation could upend traditional assumptions about employment, many students, schools, and employers are exploring alternatives to traditional college education. In this session, panelists and participants will discuss:

• How post-secondary programs can foster creativity, entrepreneurship, and other qualities that automation cannot replace, so that students can be prepared for the opportunities of the future in addition to being trained for the jobs of today,
• What skills and disciplines will be most relevant to employers in the future, and what programs or learning approaches are becoming obsolete,
• Independent of specific “hard skills”, what “soft skills” are most valuable to employers, and how those can be developed across all post-secondary training models, and
• What learning models will best answer the needs of a diverse population of post-secondary learners, many of whom are nontraditional.

Panel Discussion:

Moderator:

Joseph E. Aoun, President, Northeastern University

Participants:

D'Wayne Edwards, Founder, PENSOLE Footwear Design Academy
Andrew McAfee, Principal Research Scientist, MIT Sloan School of Management

 
Closing Plenary Session

5:30 PM -

 6:45 PM


A closing conversation with President Clinton.

Participants:

President Bill Clinton, Founder, Clinton Foundation; 42nd President of the United States
Chelsea Clinton, Vice Chair, Clinton Foundation
Rep. Joe Kennedy III, (D-Mass.)

 
Networking Event

7:00 PM -

 8:30 PM


CGI U Exchange and Dinner

CGI U Exchange is a forum for students and sponsors to showcase their organizations or Commitments to Action. This exhibition is an ideal opportunity to learn about commitments, explore partnerships, and network with other participants. Exhibitors will be organized by the five CGI U focus areas: Education, Environment and Climate Change, Peace and Human Rights, Poverty Alleviation, and Public Health. CGI U Exchange takes place on Saturday evening in conjunction with dinner; all participants with an official CGI U meeting credential are eligible and encouraged to attend.

Exhibitors are preselected for this opportunity.