Photo Credit: Bryan Sargent / Clinton Global Initiative
Friday
Sep 19
2014
September 19, 2014

Join CGI Members in Designing a Better Future

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Many of the world’s most pressing challenges are multi-dimensional. As a result, their solutions often demand the engagement of multiple stakeholders with unique perspectives and resources to address the issue. Lack of proper sanitation, for example, might cause a child to be sick and keep them out of school for long periods of time. It might also keep an employee grounded at home, causing economic consequences for their family, their employer, and their community.

Members of the CGI community have grappled with a number of global challenges over the years. They’ve debated approaches, designed models, and deployed solutions in communities around the world through their Commitments to Action. At CGI’s 10th Annual Meeting next week, CGI members will have the chance to participate in three Designing Ideas Breakout Sessions. In each session, members will bring their individual experience to the table to design new ideas and approaches to specific challenges.

We invite you to join the design process.

As part of the collaboration, we’re inviting people from around the world to join these interactive sessions and generate ideas to address these challenges: 

  • How can smallholder farmers and fishers increase their economic opportunities?
  • How can 2.5 billion people living without toilets gain access to sanitation?
  • How can communities prevent and resolve the double burden of malnutrition?

Learn more about each issue by reading the background information below, and share your ideas to address these questions on CGI’s Facebook page or on Twitter with the hashtag #CGIOpen. Then, tune in for the live webcasts of each Designing Ideas session, print the Designing Ideas worksheet, and send us the ideas you develop in real-time on Twitter. Your idea could be featured on the webcast or shared in the room by the session facilitator.

How can smallholder farmers and fishers increase their economic opportunities?

Over 80 percent of the food consumed in the developing world comes from 500 million smallholder farmers and 60 percent of the global fish catch is hauled by smallholder fishers. However, while smallholder farmers and fishers play a major role in feeding the world, they sometimes struggle to feed their own families and communities. Lack of tools, resources, and opportunities prohibit smallholder farmers and fishers from scaling their production and increasing their income. In this session, participants will reimagine how to:

• support farmers and fishers in scaling their production while protecting forests and oceans
• increase access to financing opportunities, technical assistance, and business skills to achieve higher market value for smallholders’ yields
• invest in women, who are the majority in the agricultural and fishery labor force, to close the gender-based gap and improve livelihoods

This session will be streamed live on Monday, September 22 from 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

How can 2.5 billion people living without toilets gain access to sanitation?

Lack of sanitation diminishes people’s overall health, education, and safety—it results in an estimated $260 billion worth of lost productivity, increases healthcare costs, and leads to premature death. Notably, poor sanitation and hygiene result in diarrheal diseases which kill 1.8 million people annually, 90 percent of which are children under five years of age. Further, poor sanitation disproportionately impacts women—for example, more than 50 percent of girls worldwide attend schools without sanitation systems, leading to increased absenteeism during menstruation. In this session, participants will reimagine how to:

• support NGOs and private enterprises in building sanitation infrastructure for both urban and rural environments
• assist entrepreneurs in providing sanitation solutions to their local communities
• design sanitation services to keep girls safe and in school

This session will be streamed live on Tuesday, September 23 from 2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

How can communities prevent and resolve the double burden of malnutrition?

Today, 925 million people globally suffer from hunger and undernutrition, the greatest risk factors of which lead to disease, mostly in low- and middle-income countries. Simultaneously, developing countries are grappling with the onset of obesity, driven by the overconsumption of unhealthy calories. Mexico, for example, has surpassed the United States as the most obese country in the world, and China has transitioned from famine to obesity within one generation. The long-term and irreversible consequences of nutrition deficiency and obesity—including diabetes, heart disease, and other non-communicable diseases—affect 10 percent of adults and 30 million children worldwide. In this session, participants will reimagine how to:

• support countries and communities in avoiding the shift from food scarcity to nutrition deficiency and overconsumption
• increase food availability and optimal nutrition among the malnourished, whether they are undernourished or obese
• promote better behaviors that result in healthier food choices and consumption

This session will be streamed live on Wednesday, September 24 from 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.