Permanent Exhibitions

The Clinton Center’s permanent exhibitions chronicle American history at the turn of the 21st century. Featuring interactive exhibits, including replicas of the Oval Office and the White House Cabinet Room, the collection provides a first-hand look into the life and work of President Bill Clinton. Below is a selection of our permanent exhibitions available for you to explore online.

Photo: William J. Clinton Presidential Library

Oval Office

Since its creation, every President has regarded the Oval Office as both a ceremonial room and a working office. President Clinton used the Oval Office as a place to conduct the daily business of the nation, sign legislation, meet with foreign heads of state, and deliver important addresses to the American people.

Our full-scale replica is identical in every detail to the Oval Office during President Clinton’s years at the White House.

Cabinet Room

The Cabinet Room has been the center of presidential decision-making since 1902, when it was added to the West Wing of the White House by President Theodore Roosevelt. Gathered around the long table, the President, cabinet secretaries, and other officials make tough choices about the nation’s future.

Photo: William J. Clinton Presidential Library

Photo: William J. Clinton Presidential Library

PUTTING PEOPLE FIRST

Bill Clinton argued that government could be a force for positive change in people’s lives. He committed his administration to improving the lives of children and families and extending quality health care and retirement security to millions of Americans through policies like the Family and Medical Leave Act and Children’s Health Insurance Program.

BUILDING ONE AMERICA

Bill Clinton took office determined to bring people together. He created AmeriCorps, launched the first White House effort to promote racial reconciliation, and sought to close widening economic and social gaps. Through these policies, he helped demonstrate that we, as Americans, could celebrate our differences while reaffirming our common humanity.

Photo: William J. Clinton Presidential Library

Photo: William J. Clinton Presidential Library

CONFRONTING CONFLICT, MAKING PEACE

Bill Clinton believed strongly that the United States should mobilize its strength in the cause of peace. He used diplomacy where possible and military force where necessary, to resolve conflicts from Northern Ireland to the Middle East. His willingness to go the extra mile for peace ensured that American power would be respected, not resented, in the new global age.

RESTORING THE ECONOMY

Bill Clinton believed America’s leadership in the world would depend on the strength of its economy at home. His economic strategy ushered in the longest, strongest economic expansion in American history – creating nearly 23 million jobs and turning record budget deficits into a record surplus. Every income group saw their incomes rise and millions of people moved out of poverty.

Photo: William J. Clinton Presidential Library

Photo: William J. Clinton Presidential Library

The VICE PRESIDENT

Bill Clinton and Al Gore became the youngest team ever to make it to the White House. Al Gore transformed the vice presidency, turning a largely ceremonial position into a center of ideas and innovation. He took the lead on shaping environmental policy, guiding U.S.–Russia relations, streamlining the federal government, and leading efforts to support the burgeoning information and telecommunications revolution.

THE WORK OF THE FIRST LADY

Hillary Rodham Clinton was one of our country’s most active First Ladies, assuming an unprecedented role in policy making at home and diplomacy abroad, while making the Clinton White House a showcase for American creativity. She helped shape policies to improve health care, education, child care, and foster care. She also became one of the world’s most powerful voices for women’s rights, human rights, and democracy.

Photo: William J. Clinton Presidential Library

STATE OF THE NATION

United States 1992-2000: A Statistical Portrait

HEALTH

Poor Children Insured

1992: 64.0%
2000: 69.1%

EMPLOYMENT

Total Non-Farm Employment

1992: 108.3 million
2000: 130.8 million

POVERTY

People Living Below Poverty Line

1992: 14.8%
2000: 11.3%

TECHNOLOGY

Homes with computers

1993: 22.8%
2000: 51%

Education

People 25 and older who have a bachelor’s degree

1992: 34.3 million
2000: 44.8 million

AIDS

Number of AIDS cases diagnosed

1992: 78,705
2000: 35,986

STATE OF THE WORLD

The World 1992-2000: A Statistical Portrait

TRADE VOLUME

World Foreign Direct Investment
1990: $202 billion
2000: $1.5 trillion

NUCLEAR WARHEADS

Total: U.S., Russia, U.K., China, France

1992: 52,972
2000: 31,535

DEMOCRACY

Countries with Electoral Democracies

1992: 53%
2000: 63%

POVERTY

Number of people living on less than $1 a day

1990: 1,292 million
2000: 1,169 million

LITERACY

Literacy rate of young people 15–25 years old

1990: 84.2%
2000: 86.8%

TECHNOLOGY

Number of new web sites

1993: 130
2001: 27,585,719

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