Agenda

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Plenary Session

9:15 AM -

 10:30 AM


Escalators of Opportunity

Over the last several decades, most of the world has experienced a decline in poverty rates and many emerging markets have achieved unprecedented economic growth, largely driven by progress in countries across Africa and Latin America. Despite this, more than 70 percent of people globally live in societies today that have greater income inequality than 20 years ago. This disparity in income hampers global economic growth and prohibits individuals, namely women and marginalized communities, from reaching their full potential. Addressing income inequality and social mobility starts by investing in children—placing them on the escalator to more equitable futures—and is continued by empowering individuals to create wealth and break cycles of inequality.

In this session, leaders from the private, public, and civil society sectors will discuss how CGI members can:

• Create ecosystems that promote quality lifelong learning, adequate nutrition, and improved health outcomes, starting with early childhood development.
• Empower individuals to build wealth for their families by connecting them to the formal financial system and eliminating barriers to asset and property ownership.

Moderator:

Rana Foroohar, Assistant Managing Editor and Economics Columnist, Global Economic Analyst, TIME, CNN

Participants:

Jessica Biel, Ambassador to the "Then Who Will" Campaign, WomanCare Global
Robert Collymore, Chief Executive Officer, Safaricom Limited
Maryana Iskander, Chief Executive Officer, Harambee Youth Employment Accelerator
Art Peck, Chief Executive Officer, Gap Inc.
Hanne Rasmussen, Chief Executive Officer, The LEGO Foundation
Joseph Stiglitz, Professor, Columbia University

 
Breakout Sessions

11:00 AM -

 12:30 PM


CGI Conversation hosted by CNBC's Becky Quick

Making the Economy Work for People

Session Features:  Filmed for Broadcast


Although we’d like to think markets are the best way to allocate resources and capital, they have continuously contained inefficiencies. New models driven by digitization, offer ways to create jobs, empower people, lower the costs of living, and promote more sustainable resource consumption. The rapid pace of mobile phone and internet penetration across the world has allowed businesses to flourish, bringing consumers that were previously hard to reach, access to information, finance, education and health, and this growth is set to continue as millions a year are becoming literate and equipped with smartphones. Further, with global revenues set to hit $335 billion by 2025, shared economy businesses allow asset owners capitalize the unused capacity of things they already own or untapped skills they possess. Similarly, these principles, increasingly embraced by business, have the potential to significantly contribute to waste reduction and resource savings.

In this session, leaders from the private, public and civil society sectors will discuss how CGI members can:

• Support and scale shared economy ventures that provide social and environmental value
• Accelerate access to services through digitization to support thriving livelihoods and financial wellbeing for all
• Create new markets and bring products to the base of the pyramid

Moderator:

Becky Quick, Co-Anchor, CNBC's Squawk Box

Participants:

Karen Appleton, Senior Vice President of Industry, Box, Founder, Box.org
Jim Brett, President, West Elm
John Chambers, Executive Chairman of the Board, Cisco
Erica Kochi, Senior Advisor on Innovation to the Executive Director, UNICEF , Co-founder and Co-lead, UNICEF Innovation
John McFarlane, Chairman, Barclays

One-on-One Conversation:

Moderator:

Becky Quick, Co-Anchor, CNBC's Squawk Box

Participants:

President Bill Clinton, Founding Chairman, Clinton Global Initiative, 42nd President of the United States

 

The Future of Gender Investing

Session Features:  Future Labs


Women-owned enterprises grow faster and create more jobs than those owned by men, but face numerous barriers to success despite women reinvesting their profits in the health and education of their communities at a higher rate than men. Globally, women business owners face an estimated collective credit gap of more than $300 billion, and only 6 percent of U.S. venture capital funding goes to firms run by women. Given their higher growth potential, women-led enterprises represent a multitude of lucrative opportunities for investors. The impact investing market is uniquely positioned to harness this potential and provide gender-equitable access to capital.

In this session, leaders from the public sector, private sector, and civil society will discuss how CGI members can:

• Develop and scale financial instruments, such as pay-for-success structures, that support female entrepreneurs and businesses.
• Increase and strengthen public-private investment partnerships that support women-led initiatives.
• Improve data collection for gender-related impact investments, thereby creating industry benchmarks to drive future investments.

Participants:

Jackie VanderBrug, Senior Vice President, U.S. Trust Bank of America
Muhammad Yunus, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and Chairman, Yunus Social Business Global Initiatives

 

Water Scarcity: From the Wetlands to the Water Glass

Session Features:  Calls to Action


With 20 percent of the world’s GDP and 36 percent of the global population located in severely water stressed areas, water scarcity is an economic, environmental, and social threat. Globally, 750 million people do not have access to safe drinking water, and demand for water will only increase as populations and industries grow. The need will be particularly strong in the agricultural sector, which accounts for 70 percent of the world’s freshwater use. Looking ahead, integrated approaches between the public, private, and nonprofit sectors are critical for increasing water security for all and addressing key issues such as water supply contamination, water use management, and clean water access within underserved communities.

In this session, leaders from the public sector, private sector, and civil society will discuss how CGI members can:

• Create partnerships to connect sectors spanning the life cycle of water use.
• Implement agricultural and industrial water use practices that reduce water consumption and ensure clean water is returned to communities.
• Invest in technology, financing mechanisms, and behavioral change solutions that incentivize clean water conservation and access for all.

Participants:

Jane Madgwick, Chief Executive Officer, Wetlands International
Mahadev Raman, Arup Fellow | Chairman Americas Region, Arup
Achim Steiner, Executive Director , United Nations Environment Programme
Robert Zimmerman, Senior Manager of Sustainability, Kohler Co.

Facilitators:

Ravi Chhatpar, Co-Founder and Principal, Dalberg’s Design Impact Group
Robert Fabricant, Co-Founder and Principal, Dalberg’s Design Impact Group

 
Small Group Discussions

11:00 AM -

 12:30 PM


Climate and Economic Resiliency on Islands and in Coastal Communities

As sea levels rise and extreme weather events continue to become more common, island nations and coastal communities bear a disproportionate brunt of these impacts. However, they also stand to gain a great deal from serving as leaders in the adoption of climate mitigation and adaptation strategies through systems-based thinking and early adoption of new technologies. Through marine spatial planning, resilient infrastructure, affordable clean energy for commercial and residential use, and waste management strategies that emphasize the values of reuse and maintaining pristine coastlines, critical stakeholders like government, industry, and consumers are all well-positioned to benefit. Advancing communities with a holistic design approach offers new potential to create value, increase efficiency, and manage precious resources. Investments in climate mitigation and adaptation strategies can yield higher than expected economic, environmental, and social returns.

Objectives:

• Discuss how systems thinking can unlock unrecognized economic opportunities and save communities millions of dollars per year.
• Identify current and expected infrastructure issues that islands and coastal communities face due to climate change and sea level rise.
• Share best practices for innovative financing models for businesses and individuals to adopt resiliency and adaption measures that have economic and environmental returns.

Participants:

Carlos Alonso, President , The Government of Tenerife
Dana Hyde, Chief Executive Officer, Millennium Challenge Corporation

 

Survive and Thrive: The Integration of Maternal and Child Health, Nutrition, and Education

The time between conception and the first few years of a child’s life is a critical developmental period with long-term physical and cognitive implications. Holistic interventions that promote healthy pregnancy, safe birth, appropriate vaccinations, good nutrition, and early cognitive stimulation and education not only help ensure that children survive, but also maximize their ability to thrive through childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Building on several meetings organized by CGI under its Survive and Thrive series this past year, members will celebrate CGI Commitments to Action that integrate these interventions, providing an opportunity for cross-sector networking and partnership building.

Objectives:
• Provide a platform for members to network and share best practices in the maternal and child health, nutrition, and education spaces.
• Highlight Commitments to Action that take an integrated approach to enable children to survive and thrive.
• Identify opportunities to build partnerships through cross-sector commitments.

Participants:

Nancy Aossey, President and CEO, International Medical Corps
Jessie Cronan, Executive Director, Gardens for Health International
Heidi Murkoff, Author and Advocate, What to Expect and the What to Expect Foundation

 

Tackling Child and Youth Hunger in the United States

In 2014, nearly 14 percent of American households—approximately 48 million Americans, including 15.3 million children—experienced food insecurity. Hunger can have significant, long-term effects on a young person’s health, academic performance, and future economic success. However, there are promising opportunities to bring together businesses, foundations, and nonprofits to support and scale solutions to reduce childhood and youth hunger while increasing access to healthy food. Several CGI Commitments to Action related to the 2015 CGI Call to Action on U.S. Food Insecurity are currently working to address the issue.

Objectives:

• Discuss how businesses and other partners can advance new CGI commitments and overcome core implementation barriers.
• Explore new public-private partnership opportunities that solve for the key challenges around child and youth hunger.
• Convene a community of organizations interested in eliminating childhood, youth, and teen hunger in the United States.

Remarks:

Chelsea Clinton, Vice Chair, Clinton Foundation
Mario Batali, Chef and Philanthropist , Mario Batali Foundation

 

The Market for Sustainable Products

In recent years, companies of all sizes have taken great strides to embed social and environmental sustainability into how they source, design, manufacture, distribute, and recycle products. However, building consumer acceptance continues to be a significant challenge in shaping the market for sustainable products. Identifying strategies and tools for increasing consumer awareness and the adoption of sustainably sourced products is essential to not only mainstreaming companies’ transitions to responsible sourcing, but also redefining industry quality standards to include sustainable performance.

Objectives:

• Highlight the innovative approaches companies are undertaking to test and grow the market for sustainable products, including measurement through consumer-oriented metrics, extension of the “use” phase of products, and development of incentives for suppliers and buyers.
• Discuss how retailers can effectively communicate to consumers to encourage sustainable choices.
• Explore strategies for increasing the competitiveness of sustainable products.

Participants:

Eileen Fisher, Founder and Chairwoman, Eileen Fisher, Inc.
Jay Gould, Executive Vice President and COO, Interface, Inc.
Doug Guiley, Senior Vice President, Brand Strategy and Sourcing , West Elm
Timothy Prewitt, Chief Executive Officer, International Development Enterprises

 

The Mental Health Epidemic: A Conversation on Stigma, Services, and Support

Worldwide, 450 million people are affected by mental illness, yet the majority do not receive adequate care. Vast inequality in access to mental health services remains a pressing global challenge, with only 10 percent of those affected in the developing world and 50 percent of those in wealthier countries receiving treatment. In addition, those in need of mental health services continue to suffer from both social and self-stigmatization, which can lead to a reluctance to seek treatment and poor treatment outcomes. Unmet mental health needs not only limit an individual’s capacity to lead a productive and healthy life, but also perpetuate cycles of poverty and negatively impact overall economic growth.

Objectives:

• Address the challenges of global inequality in access to mental health services and treatment.
• Mobilize public and political support to break down stigmatization and lead to greater investments in mental health.
• Develop strategies to integrate mental health services and treatment into primary health care and health systems.

Participants:

Fiona Adshead, Chief Wellbeing and Public Health Officer, Bupa
Michael Nyenhuis, President and CEO, AmeriCares Foundation

 
Plenary Session

1:00 PM -

 2:00 PM


Looking to the Next Frontier

Many of today’s disruptive ideas, technologies, and breakthroughs will serve as benefits that govern our shared future and societies. Some advancements achieved in the near-term have quickly showcased their potential to improve human well-being, including artificial intelligence, human exploration of Mars, gene therapy, and the Internet of things. However, the benefits of some of history’s most revolutionary discoveries—such as penicillin, wireless telegraphy, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)—took decades to realize. How can the innovations of today impact our societies, environment, and economies of tomorrow?

In this session, leaders from the private, public, and civil society sectors will discuss how CGI members can:

• Extend access to and use of today’s innovations by underserved communities and ensure that benefits are shared by all rather than a few.
• Invest in research and development to advance new ideas and technologies for social and environmental change.

Moderator:

Neil deGrasse Tyson, Astrophysicist, American Museum of Natural History

Participants:

Sangeeta Bhatia, Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Sir Richard Branson, Founder, Virgin Group and Virgin Unite
Fereshteh Forough, Founder and President , Code to Inspire
Pepper, Social Humanoid Robot, Aldebaran and SoftBank

 
Breakout Sessions

2:30 PM -

 4:00 PM


Starting the Food Chain with Nutrition

Session Features:  Calls to Action


Globally, more than 800 million people suffer from chronic hunger and billions more suffer from micronutrient deficiency, consuming inadequate amounts of nutrients that are essential to healthy physical and mental development. Every dollar invested in micronutrient-dense food is estimated to yield a 14-fold return in earnings and health care spend savings globally. The challenge ahead lies in increasing the nutrient value of food produced while also achieving a 70 percent increase in food production by 2050 to meet the needs of the growing global population.

In this session, leaders from the public sector, private sector, and civil society will discuss how CGI members can:

• Invest in bioengineering, biofortification, and other technologies to increase nutritious yields for farmers and fishers.
• Educate communities about micronutrients to shift production and consumption decisions.
• Equip women with tools and resources to increase yields of nutritious crops and empower them as stewards of nutrition for their communities.

Moderator:

Kathy Spahn, President and CEO, Helen Keller International

Participants:

Hugh Grant, Chairman and CEO, Monsanto
Sylvia Magezi, Uganda Program Leader, HarvestPlus
Marcus Samuelsson, Chef-Owner , Red Rooster Harlem, Ginny's Supper Club, Streetbird Rotisserie, Marcus Samuelsson Group

Facilitators:

Ravi Chhatpar, Co-Founder and Principal, Dalberg’s Design Impact Group
Robert Fabricant, Co-Founder and Principal, Dalberg’s Design Impact Group

 

Sustainable Oceans

Session Features:  Special Session


With more than 40 percent of the world’s population living within 100 kilometers of the ocean and 80 percent of global trade water-based, oceans are key to sustaining individual livelihoods and the global economy. But the combined threats of overfishing and climate change stress our oceans, demanding the need for cross-sector partnerships designed to increase ocean and coastal resilience and establish and promote sustainable fishing practices.

In this session, leaders from the private sector, public sector, and civil society will discuss how CGI members can:

• Strengthen coral reefs, mangrove forests, and other natural infrastructure to bolster resilience against climate change.
• Invest in sustainable supply chains and improve fisheries management in order to create economic opportunities and combat illegal fishing practices and overfishing.

Remarks:

President Bill Clinton, Founding Chairman, Clinton Global Initiative, 42nd President of the United States

Moderator:

Shane Smith, CEO and Co-Founder, VICE Media

Participants:

Ted Danson, Actor, Member of the Board of Directors, Oceana
Sylvia Earle, Founder and Chairman, The Sylvia Earle Alliance
María José González, Executive Director , Mesoamerican Reef Fund - MAR Fund
James Michel, President, The Republic of Seychelles

 
Small Group Discussions

2:30 PM -

 4:00 PM


Broadening the Sustainable Development Narrative to Include Gender Equality

According to the United Nations, environmental challenges and gender inequalities are mutually reinforcing, seriously jeopardizing health, education, livelihoods, and other aspects of human well-being. For example, women in rural areas of developing countries rely heavily on local natural resources because of their responsibility to secure water, food, and energy for cooking and heating. The effects of climate change, including drought, uncertain rainfall, and deforestation make it more difficult for girls and women to obtain these resources. Girls and women also face historical disadvantages, including limited decision-making power and access to economic assets, which compound the challenges of promoting environmental sustainability. As the primary caretakers of the home and the community, the greater involvement of women in decision-making is essential in addressing climate change, energy, and land-use planning.

Objectives:

• Explore the connections between gender equality and sustainable development across the energy, climate change, and built environment sectors.
• Determine what actions need to be taken to holistically advance sustainable development and gender equality.
• Identify opportunities for governments and the private sector to contribute to sustainable development solutions that include girls and women.

Participants:

Erinn McGurn, Founder and Executive Director, SCALEAfrica
Nicky McIntyre, Executive Director, Mama Cash
Radha Muthiah, Chief Executive Officer, Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves
Maura O'Neill, Distinguished Teaching Fellow, University of California at Berkeley

 

Democratic Republic of the Congo Action Network: Celebrating Successes and Looking to the Future

The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is rich in biodiversity and natural resources, as well as in ethnic and linguistic diversity among its 75 million people. The country contains most of the world’s coltan, more than one-third of the world’s cobalt and diamond reserves, and numerous national parks that are home to many rare species, such as elephants and rhinos. At the center of the continent, its health and prosperity is critical to the success of its nine border countries as well as the wider region. However, the country also has one of the lowest levels of human development, the world’s second-highest rate of infant mortality, no free access to primary education, and an unemployment rate that is between 40 and 50 percent. Since 2011, the DRC Action Network has regularly brought members of the CGI community working in the region together to share opportunities, challenges, and resources.

Objectives:

• Reconvene the multi-sector DRC Action Network to identify areas of success and best practices, share updates on past Commitments to Action, and explore new and continuing work.
• Discuss and troubleshoot challenges, as well as share resources.
• Engage new players who are interested in supporting opportunities for Congolese people to thrive and identify opportunities for ongoing partnerships.


 

Mind the Gap: Connecting Youth, Education Providers, and Tech Employers

In today’s world, youth, education providers, and employers are becoming increasingly disconnected. Half of the world’s 75 million unemployed youth feel that their education has not improved their chances of finding a job, while many employers say that the skills they seek and value are not taught to students through educational institutions. While this disconnect exists across sectors, it is especially relevant to employers in need of workers with technology skills. Equipping students with digital skills, which are integral to the global economy, has the potential to unlock employment opportunities for millions of young people.

Objectives:

• Hear from CGI commitment-makers who are strengthening the bridge from education to employment, particularly for jobs that require technological competencies.
• Frame the global youth unemployment challenge and discuss how employers, education providers, and youth themselves can work together to close the skills gap.
• Identify the types of skills that employers need and discuss best practices to fulfill that demand.

Participants:

Mike Gregoire, Chief Executive Officer, CA Technologies
Lori Harnick, General Manager for Citizenship & Public Affairs, Microsoft
Dafna Lifshitz, Chief Executive Officer, Appleseeds Academy
Mona Mourshed, Senior Partner, McKinsey & Company
Gabriela Ramos, Chief of Staff and Sherpa, Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)
Roxana Rugina, Founder and CEO, Simplon Romania

 

Risky Business: Learning from Failure to Maximize Impact

Over the past 10 years, members of the CGI community have made more than 3,200 Commitments to Action. While many of these commitments have realized great success and widespread positive impact, some have encountered challenges along the way and others have failed altogether. During this session, participants will have the opportunity to hear about common project challenges, learn risk mitigation best practices, and share their own insights. By reflecting on our common challenges and identifying the foreseeable risk factors and barriers associated with commitments, this session will highlight how considering risk at a commitment’s outset can ultimately lead to greater success in practice.

Objectives:
• Share experiences related to project risk and failure across Commitments to Action.
• Provide best practices to improve ongoing and future work.
• Solicit insight and input from participants regarding future project reporting and related programming for CGI members.

Participants:

Laurie Michaels, Founder, Open Road Alliance
Zack Rosenburg, CEO and Co-Founder, St. Bernard Project

 

Talking About Sex: Breaking Down the Stigma Around Sexual and Reproductive Health

Around the world, 225 million women want to avoid pregnancy but are not using a modern method of contraception. In addition, there are 340 million new cases of sexually transmitted infections each year and about 6,000 young people are infected with HIV every day. Access to sexual and reproductive health services is not only critical for saving lives, but also for improving gender equality, supporting women’s empowerment, and reducing poverty. Even in places where sexual and reproductive health services are available, a lack of information, stigmatization, and discrimination remain significant barriers to access.

Objectives:

• Engage in an open dialogue with community leaders, service providers, beneficiaries, and the unexpected champions of sexual and reproductive health.
• Highlight on-the-ground challenges that service providers and beneficiaries face in accessing sexual and reproductive health information and reducing stigma and discrimination.
• Explore strategies and opportunities to normalize sexual health conversations and break down negative perceptions.

Participants:

Oko Armah, Young Leader, Ghana, Women Deliver Commitment to Action
John Faison, Senior Pastor and Advisory Board Member, Watson Grove Missionary Baptist Church; The Black Church and HIV: The Social Justice Imperative, Gilead Inc. and NAACP Commitment to Action
Vanessa Geffrard, Senior Director of Education and Training, Planned Parenthood of Maryland
Kate Gilmore, Deputy Executive Director for Progamme, United Nations Population Fund
Leith Greenslade, Vice Chair, MDG Health Alliance
Oswaldo Montoya, Women and Children’s Rights Advocate, MenEngage Alliance and Promundo Commitment to Action
Catherine Nyambura, Young Leader, Women Deliver, Deputy Director, Dandelion Kenya

 
Plenary Session

4:30 PM -

 5:45 PM


Climate Change and Resiliency: Redefining Business as Usual

Investing in prevention and preparedness has proven to save lives and resources—for example, for every $1 spent on disaster preparedness, $7 is saved in future recovery efforts. Yet, investments made to address natural disasters and climate change are still too often reactionary rather than focused on long-term prevention strategies. This year marks several milestones related to such crises—the Climate Change Conference will take place in Paris in November, a decade has passed since Hurricane Katrina and the Indian Ocean tsunami, and it has been five years since the devastation of the Haiti earthquake. Future solutions require long-term commitments which focus equally on mitigation and adaptation, as well as community resiliency.

In this session, leaders from the private, public, and civil society sectors will discuss how CGI members can:

• Create incentives and reduce risk for all sectors to invest in sustainable solutions, including clean and renewable energy, and energy efficiency programs.
• Build partnerships and innovative financing mechanisms, such as flood insurance and green bonds, which promote large-scale public good initiatives.
• Utilize resources that flow in during crises to build back hard and natural infrastructure to mitigate or prevent future emergencies.

Moderator:

Judith Rodin, President, The Rockefeller Foundation

Participants:

Pelenise Alofa, National Coordinator and Country Manager, Kiribati Climate Action Network and Live & Learn Environmental Education
Theresa Jester, Chief Executive Officer, Silicor Materials, Inc.
Jim Yong Kim, President , World Bank Group
Juan Manuel Santos Calderón, President , Republic of Colombia

 
Special Event

7:30 PM -

 9:30 PM


Empowering Youth Through Computer Science Education

Dinner hosted by Microsoft

Session Features:  Off-Site Location  •   Pre-Registration Required


Today, technology is an integral part of people’s lives around the world. Yet, in order for youth to fully benefit from technology, they must be able to become its creators and innovators, not just its users and consumers. In the United States, just one in four high schools offer computer science education—a subject that builds critical skills like computational thinking and problem solving, while exposing young minds to the possibilities that computer science can enable in areas such as medicine, art, retail, manufacturing, technology, and entrepreneurship. For these reasons and more, computer science education can help every young person build a bright future. Microsoft’s YouthSpark Initiative, a CGI Commitment to Action, aims to create opportunities for all youth to learn computer science worldwide. Participants in this Topic Dinner will hear directly from youth, educators, and community leaders about the promise and potential for computer science to positively impact today’s world and tomorrow’s future.

Participants:

Justin Austin, TEALS Alumni, Microsoft
Rodrigo Baggio, President, Center for Digital Inclusion
Jennifer Chayes, Distinguished Scientist and Managing Director of Microsoft Research , Microsoft Research

 

Giving Girls a Chance

Dinner hosted by Procter & Gamble

Session Features:  Off-Site Location  •   Pre-Registration Required


It is increasingly recognized that investing in girls and women not only empowers communities, but strengthens the global economy. For example, if empowered with the appropriate job skills, girls could increase global GDP by as much as 5.4 percent. Creating the conditions to unlock their full potential, however, requires greater advancements in terms of education, health care, and safety worldwide. To further the agenda for girls and women, this Topic Dinner will feature three global advocates who will share their perspectives on current programs and multi-sector partnerships that focus on family planning, gender-based violence, health challenges, economic development, and education. Participants will discuss how to overcome existing barriers and also innovate solutions that create pathways so that girls and women can not only improve their lives, but thrive.

Participants:

Tina Brown, Founder and CEO, Tina Brown Live Media and Women in the World
Ashley Judd, Ambassador, Population Services International
Sienna Miller, Global Ambassador, International Medical Corps
Michelle Nunn, President & CEO, CARE
Pasquine Ogunsanya, Executive Director and Founder, Alive Medical Services

 

Transforming the Global Energy Landscape: Environmental Opportunities and Challenges

Dinner hosted by Cheniere Energy

Session Features:  Off-Site Location  •   Pre-Registration Required


Over the last decade, the United States has transformed itself into a net exporter of energy while reducing carbon emissions through the expansion of new advanced technologies. As a 21st century energy leader, the United States is well-positioned to accelerate a worldwide transition to a cleaner energy future through a diverse set of energy resources. Globally, there is greater potential than ever to reduce pollutants and address climate change while also driving economic growth. Nevertheless, low-emission energy options can at times be accompanied by environmental challenges at the local level. During this dinner, a panel of experts will discuss how this historic opportunity can lead to innovation in the transition to a balanced, clean energy sector and help secure the futures of communities, the global economy, and the environment.

Moderator:

Jason Bordoff, Founding Director, Center on Global Energy Policy, Columbia University

Participants:

Charif Souki, Chairman and CEO, Cheniere Energy, Inc.
Lawrence Summers, Charles W. Eliot University Professor, Harvard Kennedy School
Sue Tierney, Senior Advisor, Analysis Group
Heather Zichal, Distinguished Fellow, Atlantic Council

 

7:45 PM -

 9:30 PM


Celebrating Our Educators: The Global Teacher Prize

Dinner hosted by The Varkey Foundation

Session Features:  Off-Site Location  •   Pre-Registration Required


The Global Teacher Prize is an annual $1 million award given to an exceptional teacher who has made an outstanding contribution to the profession. Created by the Varkey Foundation and referred to as the “Nobel Prize of Teaching,” this award not only celebrates the exceptional teachers of today, but raises the stature of the teaching profession. The winner is chosen from over 5,000 nominations, and the prize has received support from Her Majesty Queen Rania Al Abdullah, President Bill Clinton, Bill Gates, Mikhail Gorbachev, Kevin Spacey, and 35 former world leaders.

During the CGI 2015 Annual Meeting, the Varkey Foundation will host a Topic Dinner dedicated to teacher appreciation. Keynote speaker Nancie Atwell, the winner of the 2015 Global Teacher Prize, will share her personal love of literature, her innovative techniques, and the joys of teaching with participants. Additionally, a series of speakers will share their personal experiences on teachers who have changed their lives, and further illuminate the role that educators can play in influencing student development and growth.

Participants:

Nancie Atwell, School Founder and Writing Support Teacher, Center for Teaching and Learning
Fareed Zakaria, Host, CNN's Fareed Zakaria GPS, Columnist, Washington Post

 

8:00 PM -

 9:30 PM


Unfinished Business: Achieving Parity at Work and at Home

Dinner hosted by Barclays

Session Features:  Off-Site Location  •   Pre-Registration Required


Corporations are increasingly realizing the power of greater diversity in the boardroom and across the workforce—ultimately benefiting corporate culture and the bottom line. Yet, despite efforts to break down barriers to advance the full participation of working parents, the pace of improvement and the creation of supportive workplace practices lag behind. From enhancing parental leave policies to creating a more supportive corporate culture, companies are uniquely positioned to support individuals in achieving their aspirations at work and at home while also improving productivity, competitiveness, and the ability to attract and retain talent. This Topic Dinner will feature a dynamic conversation between Chelsea Clinton and Anne-Marie Slaughter that will focus on opportunities in which both men and women can live full, purposeful, and productive lives at home and in the workplace.

Participants:

Anne-Marie Slaughter, President and CEO, New America